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Actually, regen begins as you release the accelerator. You can see this on your dashboard. In L mode, it begins sooner and more aggressively then in D mode, but it occurs in both. When you press the brake, unless you are braking hard, I believe it is all regen until you slow to about 4 mph, then the friction brake kicks in.
 

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Actually, regen begins as you release the accelerator. You can see this on your dashboard. In L mode, it begins sooner and more aggressively then in D mode, but it occurs in both. When you press the brake, unless you are braking hard, I believe it is all regen until you slow to about 4 mph, then the friction brake kicks in.
Or if you brake very hard very quickly the friction brakes will kick in because you are asking for a lot of deceleration.
 

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I've had a 2011 and now a 2019 Volt. I remember EVERYONE (4-5 years ago) was touting driving in L is better than D. I drive exclusively in L. I don't pay attention to gas mileage, electric mileage, regen numbers etc.
L has obvious better acceleration "grab", brake "grabbing" stops, whether rolling or SUDDEN to avoid some idiot. In D the car feels loose like a coasting gear. SO, what happen to all the pro "L" drivers.
The "regen brake" paddle works great as the main brake also Today I had a situation where the person decided I didn't exist and pulled out from a street on my left, grabbed the paddle and stepped on the brake and the Volt BRAKED HARD and avoided a collision.
 

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You say L has obvious better acceleration. I don't think that is even possible. The L and D have nothing to do with transmission or gearing or anything related to that, it's ONLY amount of regeneration.
 

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You say L has obvious better acceleration. I don't think that is even possible. The L and D have nothing to do with transmission or gearing or anything related to that, it's ONLY amount of regeneration.
Not only is it not possible, it's just not true. Even Sport mode doesn't have better acceleration, it just feels that way because of the deflection of your foot that necessary.
 

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I drive a 2017 Premier and always drive in L. I like the responsiveness and love how it reacts in cruse control. No mater up hill or down it will maintain the speed automatically applying regen down hill to maintain the speed. I also use the up/down speed to change speed on the freeway to match changing speed limits never leaving cruse control. Panic stops are with both the paddle and break. If traffic begins to slow I just tap the paddle first and then reset cruse if it is a uniform show down. My best recharge range was 60 miles electrical on one of those perfect warm, but not too hot days.
 

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I have a 2019 that I've owned for over a year now and have driving it on "L" at all times since day one. As I'm on the freeway for example and need to decelerate at any given time I can just let go of the gas pedal (stage one) and if I need further deceleration I can tap on the regen paddle (stage two) for extra oomph and it works out great, hardly ever needing to use the brake pedal, and the whole process is very smooth even logically speaking..

My question is what is the point of using the regen paddle when driving in D which I have been driving today just to try it. Under the same scenario above I would just step on the brake to decelerate (since almost no regen takes place by letting go of the gas pedal) and if I want further deceleration (and regen) I would just step on the brake further instead of tapping on the regen paddle (which would do the same thing but would make no sense since I already have my foot on the brake to begin with). And if I choose to tap the regen paddle rather than going for the break paddle as soon as I want to decelerate that might be a bit too much since the regen paddle is pretty aggresive.

It really does seem that the regen paddle makes no sense when driving in D and lots of sense when driving in L and yet officially Chevy wants us to use L only in hills or stop and go traffic.

So I guess my question is for those who drive in D all the time (of most of the time): under what circumstances do you ever use the regen paddle vs just stepping on the brake paddle further?

Thanks,
I have a 2017 Volt Premier with Low Energy tires. I drive in D and use the paddle as I like the gentle slowing and use pedal for fast stops. It coasts forever with a very slow drop off. I just tap the paddle and drop out of cruise control until I am off the interstate and onto the ramp. Then I usually hit the the paddle halfway down the ramp for a compromise between speed and loss. That is almost a mile unpowered. On my typical drive to and from work, I do a similar stop in 6 places. I don't see getting that kind of savings from regen. Better to not waste than to try to recover. But, I regen hard so I probably regen as much as L for a given stop. I am in Iowa. So, I usually don't have to worry about offending cars behind me for coasting. I only put it in L for mountains because my dealer told me to. With Covid traffic, I often drive 40 miles only seeing a couple other cars.
 

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I have a 2019 that I've owned for over a year now and have driving it on "L" at all times since day one. As I'm on the freeway for example and need to decelerate at any given time I can just let go of the gas pedal (stage one) and if I need further deceleration I can tap on the regen paddle (stage two) for extra oomph and it works out great, hardly ever needing to use the brake pedal, and the whole process is very smooth even logically speaking..

My question is what is the point of using the regen paddle when driving in D which I have been driving today just to try it. Under the same scenario above I would just step on the brake to decelerate (since almost no regen takes place by letting go of the gas pedal) and if I want further deceleration (and regen) I would just step on the brake further instead of tapping on the regen paddle (which would do the same thing but would make no sense since I already have my foot on the brake to begin with). And if I choose to tap the regen paddle rather than going for the break paddle as soon as I want to decelerate that might be a bit too much since the regen paddle is pretty aggresive.

It really does seem that the regen paddle makes no sense when driving in D and lots of sense when driving in L and yet officially Chevy wants us to use L only in hills or stop and go traffic.

So I guess my question is for those who drive in D all the time (of most of the time): under what circumstances do you ever use the regen paddle vs just stepping on the brake paddle further?

Thanks,
Braking to slow down because you were going to fast is bad (0% efficient). Regen is better (50%). But coasting to the next traffic speed is ALWAYS better (maybe 90% preservation of kinetic energy?).
But if you do have to stop or slow down unexpectedly because of the situation (and have to throw away all that free momentum , then remember, go ahead and MAX REGEN to the anticipated final speed immediately, dont slow down slowly. This will let you "waste" that excessive speed back into the battery instead of wasting it with the higher air drag at the higher speed.

I used to target my coasting to arrive at the next stop at near zero speed. Wrong. Now I still target a coast to the stop, but if I am traveling too fast to do that withi no brakes, I hit the regen to capture the most energy at the initial higher speed, while still releasing the regen when the speed is lower with enough energy to still coast to the same stop. Its obvioius That this gets some useful energy back into the battery that would otherwise have been lost to the higher air drag at the beginning of the process.
Bob
 

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Braking to slow down because you were going to fast is bad (0% efficient). Regen is better (50%). But coasting to the next traffic speed is ALWAYS better (maybe 90% preservation of kinetic energy?).
But if you do have to stop or slow down unexpectedly because of the situation (and have to throw away all that free momentum , then remember, go ahead and MAX REGEN to the anticipated final speed immediately, dont slow down slowly. This will let you "waste" that excessive speed back into the battery instead of wasting it with the higher air drag at the higher speed.

I used to target my coasting to arrive at the next stop at near zero speed. Wrong. Now I still target a coast to the stop, but if I am traveling too fast to do that withi no brakes, I hit the regen to capture the most energy at the initial higher speed, while still releasing the regen when the speed is lower with enough energy to still coast to the same stop. Its obvioius That this gets some useful energy back into the battery that would otherwise have been lost to the higher air drag at the beginning of the process.
Bob
I try to "coast" as much as possible too. That is truly the most efficient.

But it sounds like you are assuming that when you press the brake pedal, you are engaging the friction brake. On the Volts, that is not the case. I believe the only times the friction brake comes into play is if you have to push very hard on the brake pedal (enough to slow the car faster than the regen paddle would) and when the car slows to below 4 mph. At all other times (when you let off the accelerator, when you press the brake pedal, and when you pull the regen paddle) you are using regen braking. That being said, I don't know that regen braking fast is any more efficient in recapturing electrons than slow regen braking. I'm guessing it's close to a wash, and that other variables make more of a difference.
 

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I own a Gen1. My questions are:
i) Is there a link that tells that when you hit the brake pedal it activates regen? Its news to me.. I thought that it was friction braking
My understanding is that the Volt has a "blended" braking system. When your foot presses on the brake pedal, you are requesting a certain amount of braking power. This will be provided entirely by the regenerative braking system if it is capable of doing so. If the braking power demanded is greater than can be supplied by regen alone, then friction braking is "blended in" to meet the request. There is also a minimum speed below which the car’s energy level is insufficient to create regen (~5 mph?), and friction braking will be used. If the car is in Neutral, the regenerative braking system is disengaged, and friction brakes will be applied at any speed.

For more research, I note it is easy to use the forum search function for a topic. Some interesting comments on the design of regenerative brakes can be found in a thread from 2008-2010, including a comment by WopOnTour on brake pedal use, "If you carefully monitor the regen gage on the IPC (or scan tool) you can actually maximize the regen energy while staying "just" under the introduction of hydraulically driven frictional forces (the conventional brake calipers)...":

 

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I think of L mode as golf cart mode. I never use it. Haven't found a time when it makes sense. D with coast and paddle for braking, I believe, is the best way to improve range, and feels the most like all the other cars I've driven.
 

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Going to go with what others have said: Use what works for you. Myself I used L mode in my around town and stop and go traffic driving with D mode used with my freeway speeds. L provides great regenerative braking for around town and stop and go. D allows me to better maintain speed when the situation warrants as much. I use the paddle all the time whether in L or D. In L mode the extra "braking" allows me to minimize the use of braking. In D mode I use it to slow down if approaching a situation that warrants a slight decrease in speed. This is how I drive my Volt, others methods will differ.
 

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I use L most of the time. Works for me- just have to pay a bit more attention to throttle position.
On the hiway I almost always use the cruise.

I found regen can make a considerable difference, depending on terrain.
I recently drove up to a mountain area behind my house- used almost all the battery.
Coming back down it recharged to about half estimated range again.
I never touched the brakes, just ‘L’ and very occasionally the paddle.
 

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I'm confused by all the people talking about using the regen paddle to cancel cruise control. Don't you have this leftmost button?
170842
 

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Sure, but a lot easier to reach the paddle without looking.(without accidently hitting the wrong button)
 
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Sure, your Volt’s cruise control can be disengaged by tapping the brakes (via pedal or paddle), but intentionally applying the brakes via the paddle is a positive braking maneuver that possibly consumes more of the car’s kinetic energy than would be consumed by merely disengaging the throttle (i.e., by tapping the cruise control disengage button) and allowing the car to "coast" in the regen setting you’ve chosen, D or L, to reduce your speed appropriately without applying the brakes. Once you tap the Resume CC speed button (it’s located VERY close to the disengage cruise control button), any additional speed you’ve lost by using the paddle to disengage cruise control will require using additional battery power to accelerate back up to cruise control speed.
 

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I use the brake pedal, the regen paddle, and the cruise cancel button. A lot of it depends on why I'm cancelling the cruise. My wife's Clarity beeps when you use the regen paddle for this purpose - very annoying.
 

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Sure, your Volt’s cruise control can be disengaged by tapping the brakes (via pedal or paddle), but intentionally applying the brakes via the paddle is a positive braking maneuver that possibly consumes more of the car’s kinetic energy than would be consumed by merely disengaging the throttle (i.e., by tapping the cruise control disengage button) and allowing the car to "coast" in the regen setting you’ve chosen, D or L, to reduce your speed appropriately without applying the brakes. Once you tap the Resume CC speed button (it’s located VERY close to the disengage cruise control button), any additional speed you’ve lost by using the paddle to disengage cruise control will require using additional battery power to accelerate back up to cruise control speed.
I feel that I can tap the paddle without engaging it. I don't have to "apply" the paddle to cancel CC. Any regen braking that might occur from an instantaneous light tap on the paddle is significantly less than the regen I get from "coasting" in D (I only drive in L in stop/go traffic). You might want to give it a try. If it doesn't work for you, just do whatever works best for you. Others might find this tip helpful.
 
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