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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2019 that I've owned for over a year now and have driving it on "L" at all times since day one. As I'm on the freeway for example and need to decelerate at any given time I can just let go of the gas pedal (stage one) and if I need further deceleration I can tap on the regen paddle (stage two) for extra oomph and it works out great, hardly ever needing to use the brake pedal, and the whole process is very smooth even logically speaking..

My question is what is the point of using the regen paddle when driving in D which I have been driving today just to try it. Under the same scenario above I would just step on the brake to decelerate (since almost no regen takes place by letting go of the gas pedal) and if I want further deceleration (and regen) I would just step on the brake further instead of tapping on the regen paddle (which would do the same thing but would make no sense since I already have my foot on the brake to begin with). And if I choose to tap the regen paddle rather than going for the break paddle as soon as I want to decelerate that might be a bit too much since the regen paddle is pretty aggresive.

It really does seem that the regen paddle makes no sense when driving in D and lots of sense when driving in L and yet officially Chevy wants us to use L only in hills or stop and go traffic.

So I guess my question is for those who drive in D all the time (of most of the time): under what circumstances do you ever use the regen paddle vs just stepping on the brake paddle further?

Thanks,
 

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I had a 2011 which I drove in L for a few years and finally switched to D, not sure of the reason, I just did. Obviously no regen paddle on gen 1. Now I have a 2018 and drive only in D, except mountains and such. I use the regen paddle all of the time. I have gotten pretty good at timing stoplights where I can pull the paddle and stop right behind the car in front of me. Of course I need the brake for the last 5 feet, but it seems easier than moving my foot to the brake, I know, that is a chore, lol. So for me, yes, I use the paddle MUCH more than the brake. I'm sure you will get many different opinions.
 

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It's simply another option, an alternative that enables you to use your hand instead of your foot, which many like. User preference. What's the purpose of the audio volume control on the steering wheel versus the one on the radio? Same thing, a "handy" alternative, haha
 
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Also, keep in mind that the brake pedal does the exact same thing as the paddle EXCEPT that the brake pedal has variable regen braking where the paddle does not.
 
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The regenerative braking system is an alternative to the friction braking system. Its primary function is to brake the car by using the car’s kinetic energy to do work (crank a generator), not to recharge the battery. In the Volt, regen is a bonus. D and L are not "driving gears," but levels of regen. The paddle is another source of applying a fixed level of braking. I suspect one could view tapping the paddle as similar to tapping on the brake pedal at that particular stopping pressure, and become accustomed to pulling on the paddle instead of tapping the brake pedal in appropriate driving conditions when driving in D as well as in L. None of these regenerative braking options are substitutes for friction brakes in panic stop situations.

The D and L and "regen on demand paddle" options are tools each driver can use to develop efficient braking habits. Some use L in stop and go traffic and for maintaining cruise control speed while descending a hill. Some don’t use it at all, preferring the "normal" feel of "coasting" as you ease off the accelerator. Some use L all the time because the more aggressive regen level, in a sense, allows you to increase the braking simply by easing off the accelerator. This feature is advertised as "one pedal driving," and enables many drivers to handle many traffic conditions calling for braking the car without moving the foot from accelerator to brake pedal.

Efficient braking habits minimize the portion of the full battery charge used by the car for acceleration (to traffic flow speed initially, and to accelerate back up to traffic flow speeds after traffic-caused slowdowns), increasing the portion of a full charge available for maintaining speed.
 

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I'll add my two cents ... the amount of range you get back between D and L (with or without the paddle) is negligible; regen just isn't that efficient. As an old hypermiler, I do better in D as I'm focused on maintaining momentum and gentle reduction in speeds which I can achieve better in D. I find L or the paddle to be much more aggressive in stopping than is either efficient or comfortable (though that could be a technique issue that would improve if I drove in L long enough).

I personally feel D is safer because my foot is already on the brake pedal when I'm in traffic and I could make an emergency stop faster. Again, that may be a technique issue.

Even though I drive in D, I still use the paddle in two situations: (1) traffic conditions change and I need to stop more aggressively than I had planned; (2) very low speed stop and go driving (parking lots, heavy traffic).

Bottom line is that for efficiency (and comfort), maintaining momentum and gentle stopping is more important than regen. Whichever braking method gets you there is the one you should use ... or not since the delta between the various methods isn't going to be very much w/r/t efficiency.
 

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I personally feel D is safer because my foot is already on the brake pedal when I'm in traffic and I could make an emergency stop faster. Again, that may be a technique issue.

Even though I drive in D, I still use the paddle in two situations: (1) traffic conditions change and I need to stop more aggressively than I had planned; (2) very low speed stop and go driving (parking lots, heavy traffic).
I prefer feathering between D and L as needed. But regarding safety, when driving my Bolt in L, it's more aggressive in slowing down the car than D. It's much more like braking. So the instant I take my foot off the pedal it's braking. That split second between foot off the pedal and foot on the brake could make a difference.
 

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When I first got my Gen2, I used to play around with the paddle. Then I came to the realization that it's essentially useless because the brakes do regenerative braking better than the paddle does.
 

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I normally drive in D and use the paddle. However, since I'm an old stick shift driver I frequently "downshift" to L to slow down faster without using the brakes. I'll also use L plus the regen paddle to slow down even faster without touching the brakes. Using this combined technique I find I frequently don't need to even touch the brake pedal until the very last moment (<5 KPH) to come to a complete stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I had a 2011 which I drove in L for a few years and finally switched to D, not sure of the reason, I just did. Obviously no regen paddle on gen 1. Now I have a 2018 and drive only in D, except mountains and such. I use the regen paddle all of the time. I have gotten pretty good at timing stoplights where I can pull the paddle and stop right behind the car in front of me. Of course I need the brake for the last 5 feet, but it seems easier than moving my foot to the brake, I know, that is a chore, lol. So for me, yes, I use the paddle MUCH more than the brake. I'm sure you will get many different opinions.
I see thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's simply another option, an alternative that enables you to use your hand instead of your foot, which many like. User preference. What's the purpose of the audio volume control on the steering wheel versus the one on the radio? Same thing, a "handy" alternative, haha
Good point thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Also, keep in mind that the brake pedal does the exact same thing as the paddle EXCEPT that the brake pedal has variable regen braking where the paddle does not.
Exactly and thus why the paddle is a bit abrupt when used im D, it goes from almosy no regen to max regen, but when driving in L drive the regen from paddle is a bit more smooth since by the time I use it I already was regenerating kind of aggressively by letting off my foot from the gas pedal. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The regenerative braking system is an alternative to the friction braking system. Its primary function is to brake the car by using the car’s kinetic energy to do work (crank a generator), not to recharge the battery. In the Volt, regen is a bonus. D and L are not "driving gears," but levels of regen. The paddle is another source of applying a fixed level of braking. I suspect one could view tapping the paddle as similar to tapping on the brake pedal at that particular stopping pressure, and become accustomed to pulling on the paddle instead of tapping the brake pedal in appropriate driving conditions when driving in D as well as in L. None of these regenerative braking options are substitutes for friction brakes in panic stop situations.

The D and L and "regen on demand paddle" options are tools each driver can use to develop efficient braking habits. Some use L in stop and go traffic and for maintaining cruise control speed while descending a hill. Some don’t use it at all, preferring the "normal" feel of "coasting" as you ease off the accelerator. Some use L all the time because the more aggressive regen level, in a sense, allows you to increase the braking simply by easing off the accelerator. This feature is advertised as "one pedal driving," and enables many drivers to handle many traffic conditions calling for braking the car without moving the foot from accelerator to brake pedal.

Efficient braking habits minimize the portion of the full battery charge used by the car for acceleration (to traffic flow speed initially, and to accelerate back up to traffic flow speeds after traffic-caused slowdowns), increasing the portion of a full charge available for maintaining speed.
👍👍
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'll add my two cents ... the amount of range you get back between D and L (with or without the paddle) is negligible; regen just isn't that efficient. As an old hypermiler, I do better in D as I'm focused on maintaining momentum and gentle reduction in speeds which I can achieve better in D. I find L or the paddle to be much more aggressive in stopping than is either efficient or comfortable (though that could be a technique issue that would improve if I drove in L long enough).

I personally feel D is safer because my foot is already on the brake pedal when I'm in traffic and I could make an emergency stop faster. Again, that may be a technique issue.

Even though I drive in D, I still use the paddle in two situations: (1) traffic conditions change and I need to stop more aggressively than I had planned; (2) very low speed stop and go driving (parking lots, heavy traffic).

Bottom line is that for efficiency (and comfort), maintaining momentum and gentle stopping is more important than regen. Whichever braking method gets you there is the one you should use ... or not since the delta between the various methods isn't going to be very much w/r/t efficiency.
You're right, I'm finding out that diving im D for the first time is forcing me to coast more which is always better for efficiency. I was already use to decelerating later since L regens much stronger.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I normally drive in D and use the paddle. However, since I'm an old stick shift driver I frequently "downshift" to L to slow down faster without using the brakes. I'll also use L plus the regen paddle to slow down even faster without touching the brakes. Using this combined technique I find I frequently don't need to even touch the brake pedal until the very last moment (<5 KPH) to come to a complete stop.
This is going to be my new modus operandi thanks
 

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This is going to be my new modus operandi thanks
It takes practice but you'll quickly learn how fast the car will slow. When the battery has less than about half a KWh of space in the top it doesn't always work. For those times the brake pedal still works and uses regen before friction braking. I've also discovered that using the brakes lightly will trigger the regen features when the car won't do it for you when you shift to L or pull the regen paddle.
 

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I have a 2019 that I've owned for over a year now and have driving it on "L" at all times since day one. As I'm on the freeway for example and need to decelerate at any given time I can just let go of the gas pedal (stage one) and if I need further deceleration I can tap on the regen paddle (stage two) for extra oomph and it works out great, hardly ever needing to use the brake pedal, and the whole process is very smooth even logically speaking..

My question is what is the point of using the regen paddle when driving in D which I have been driving today just to try it. Under the same scenario above I would just step on the brake to decelerate (since almost no regen takes place by letting go of the gas pedal) and if I want further deceleration (and regen) I would just step on the brake further instead of tapping on the regen paddle (which would do the same thing but would make no sense since I already have my foot on the brake to begin with). And if I choose to tap the regen paddle rather than going for the break paddle as soon as I want to decelerate that might be a bit too much since the regen paddle is pretty aggresive.

It really does seem that the regen paddle makes no sense when driving in D and lots of sense when driving in L and yet officially Chevy wants us to use L only in hills or stop and go traffic.

So I guess my question is for those who drive in D all the time (of most of the time): under what circumstances do you ever use the regen paddle vs just stepping on the brake paddle further?

Thanks,
I almost never use ‘L’. Why would you do that? I use the paddle quite a bit In ‘D’ and only brake when I need friction braking. Yes, regen does occur with pedal, but both friction and regen can occur.
 

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I use the paddle for one thing, and one thing only... to cancel cruise control. I tried using it when I first got my Volt and didn't like it because I almost never brake that hard. But as others have said, it's all simply a matter of preference. There is no right or wrong way- just what is most fun for you.
 

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I have a 2019 that I've owned for over a year now and have driving it on "L" at all times since day one. As I'm on the freeway for example and need to decelerate at any given time I can just let go of the gas pedal (stage one) and if I need further deceleration I can tap on the regen paddle (stage two) for extra oomph and it works out great, hardly ever needing to use the brake pedal, and the whole process is very smooth even logically speaking..

My question is what is the point of using the regen paddle when driving in D which I have been driving today just to try it. Under the same scenario above I would just step on the brake to decelerate (since almost no regen takes place by letting go of the gas pedal) and if I want further deceleration (and regen) I would just step on the brake further instead of tapping on the regen paddle (which would do the same thing but would make no sense since I already have my foot on the brake to begin with). And if I choose to tap the regen paddle rather than going for the break paddle as soon as I want to decelerate that might be a bit too much since the regen paddle is pretty aggresive.

It really does seem that the regen paddle makes no sense when driving in D and lots of sense when driving in L and yet officially Chevy wants us to use L only in hills or stop and go traffic.

So I guess my question is for those who drive in D all the time (of most of the time): under what circumstances do you ever use the regen paddle vs just stepping on the brake paddle further?

Thanks,
On another subject, what is your best miles per charge on your 2019?
 

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I own a Gen1. My questions are:
i) Is there a link that tells that when you hit the brake pedal it activates regen? Its news to me.. I thought that it was friction braking
ii) Were there any serious study on D vs L driving on range?

On my Gen1, we don't have the paddle. So I typically drive on L. After a full charge it displays 51 miles range.
In reality it seems to go 44-46 miles on 10kWh. I don't have charging at home so I never experimented with D.
 
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