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Just saw this article about a 2019 Bolt vehicle fire that took place on July 4th: GM to investigate Chevy Bolt fire

It does not appear that the Chevy Bolt was being charged when the fire occurred.There were no visible flames but enough heat was generated to melt the backseat and some plastic electrical parts. The owner's insurance company declared the car a total loss.

The 2019 Bolt has a five-star government safety rating. After some online research, the owner found several other Chevy Bolts that were destroyed in fires. Armed with that new information, the owner asked General Motors to investigate the case. GM initially refused, saying it was now in the hands of the insurance company. The owner reached out to 7 On Your Side; After being contacted by 7 On Your Side GM has agreed to investigate the incident.
 
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Most likely a battery defect. I hope the incident gets thoroughly investigated by GM, so to improve battery safety.
 

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I wonder how many ICEV fires occurred across the country on the same day. BEV fires get a lot of attention because they're relatively rare. ICEV fires get local attention because they're unfortunately too common. I do hope GM investigates to figure out what went wrong so they can improve the car.
 

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I wonder how many ICEV fires occurred across the country on the same day. BEV fires get a lot of attention because they're relatively rare. ICEV fires get local attention because they're unfortunately too common. I do hope GM investigates to figure out what went wrong so they can improve the car.
So, true.
 

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A quick surf on the internet located this statement:

"The National Fire Protection Association reports that a driver is 5 times more likely to experience a fire in a conventional gas-powered car than in an electric car. Federal officials are looking at this tragedy, but that report will take at least a year."

The Wikipedia article on "Plug-in electric vehicle fire incidents" states that:

"As of February 2014, four fires after an impact have been reported associated with the batteries of plug-in electric cars. The first crash related fire was reported in China in May 2012, after a high-speed car crashed into a BYD e6 taxi in Shenzhen. Two incidents occurred with the Tesla Model S in October 2013, one when a Model S caught fire after the electric car hit metal debris on a highway in Kent, Washington, and another involving a loss of control and collision with a tree in Merida, Mexico. A Tesla Model S being driven on a highway near Murfreesboro, Tennessee caught fire in November 2013 after it struck a tow hitch on the roadway, causing damage beneath the vehicle... A Mitsubishi Outlander fire in May 2019 appeared to be related to immersion in salt water (which is electrically conductive), probably for an hour or two."

whereas, from the same article:

"Fire incidents in highway capable vehicles occur relatively frequently. A study of U.S. fires from 2003-2007 finds that fire departments respond to an average of 287,000 vehicle fires per year, or 30 vehicle fires per hour, and that vehicles were involved in 17% of all reported U.S. fires. The study also finds that roughly 90 highway vehicle fires and 0.15 highway vehicle fire deaths were reported per billion miles driven."
 

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I wonder how many ICEV fires occurred across the country on the same day. BEV fires get a lot of attention because they're relatively rare. ICEV fires get local attention because they're unfortunately too common. I do hope GM investigates to figure out what went wrong so they can improve the car.
Same day? Dunno. 2014-2016 averaged 171,000 vehicle fires per year, though, and it if were all EVs, they'd all have been banned already. That's about one every three minutes.

 

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Here is the article on InsideEVs: Chevy Bolt Goes Up In Smoke
I always enjoy lines like "Some research told her that many other Chevy Bolts have been victims of fires." The entire level of urgency of the article depends on that one line and it communicates absolutely zero facts. And a websearch of that sentence turns up on the first page an article by our boy from last year, talking about the only other Bolt fire (the Ukranian one) I found press about, with Google latching onto the mention that a couple of Volts have caught on fire over the years as reason to show it. As far as Inside EVs own reporting of Bolt fires goes, there's been exactly two different incidents mentioned: The Ukraine one and the one in that very articles, so the leaving in of the vague "some research" line seems very puzzling.
 

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General Motors Co said Thursday it has completed a software update to address a recall of nearly 69,000 Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles for fire risks and will replace battery module assemblies as necessary.

GM said dealers will use "diagnostic tools to identify potential battery anomalies and replace battery module assemblies as necessary." They will install "advanced onboard diagnostic software into these vehicles that, among other things, has the ability to detect potential issues related to changes in battery module performance before problems can develop" the automaker added.

Owners of 2019 model year Chevrolet Bolt EVs will be able to software update starting today and 2017 and 2018 Bolt EVs owners will be eligible by the end of May.
 
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