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I own my home and a 2018 volt.
But I am going to have to move to an apartment and I really doubt I can find one that lets me leave my car charging overnight.

My options look grim.
1. Sit at the charging station for 2.3 hrs a day.
2. Try to find an apartment that has 1 shared charging station and hope its avail and does not have a time limit.
3. leave the Volt in hold mode forever and pretend its a hybrid only.
4. Try to rent a one bedroom home that I can toss an extension cord out to my car.

Can someone give me some advise please. I really dont want to buy another home just so I dont have to worry where my power is coming from.

Wow, when I was buying this car a few months ago it never occurred to me I may need to move from my home.
The reason I dont want to buy another home is that I am hoping to retire and move away in less than 3 years, but will probably be forced to sell the home i own now or in the near future.
 

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Lots of Gen 1 Volts were company cars that never got plugged in. Your option 5 is just use it like a regular car, sort of like #3 except hold mode isn't necessary
 

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I rent. My parking bay has an EVSE in it. Because that was a thing I actually SOUGHT when I was looking for apartments. It turns out that there was (when I was looking three years ago) about six residence buildings that have EVSEs for tenants; some shared, some rented with the parking space. Some metered, some not.

And the Volt works fine as a hybrid.
 

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Real estate reacts to market trends, just like hotels do. They now offer amenities that once did not exist. Find units that offer a parking option with an outlet and tell them you want to use it for charging your car. Make it clear as part of the contract so they don't later lock you out of charging. Pay for the electricity used, it's not a lot of $ as you know.
 

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The reason I dont want to buy another home is that I am hoping to retire and move away in less than 3 years, but will probably be forced to sell the home i own now or in the near future.
If you are going to move again in 3 years, why not stay in your home? Why would you be "forced" to sell? Where do you live?
 

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Assuming you are working now maybe there are some charging options near your workplace? Not ideal but at least you could get some daytime charging done.
 

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There are solutions if you look for them. On another EV forum I've frequented for 6+ years there are many owners driving pure EV's with no engine back-up and they have found ways around the problem

Don
 

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Depends where you live. In Vancouver, BC for instance, they used to have all condos, apartments, have to put in a certain amount of EV chargers to get a building permit (I think it was something like 20%). Now that's changed to 100% but they are pretty "green". In other places the term "green" just refers to the colour of money. :p
 

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Until you look, how do you know you won't find one with a way to charge? Even a 120v outlet can charge you overnight.

I own my home and a 2018 volt.
But I am going to have to move to an apartment and I really doubt I can find one that lets me leave my car charging overnight.

My options look grim.
1. Sit at the charging station for 2.3 hrs a day.
2. Try to find an apartment that has 1 shared charging station and hope its avail and does not have a time limit.
3. leave the Volt in hold mode forever and pretend its a hybrid only.
4. Try to rent a one bedroom home that I can toss an extension cord out to my car.

Can someone give me some advise please. I really dont want to buy another home just so I dont have to worry where my power is coming from.

Wow, when I was buying this car a few months ago it never occurred to me I may need to move from my home.
The reason I dont want to buy another home is that I am hoping to retire and move away in less than 3 years, but will probably be forced to sell the home i own now or in the near future.
 

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The Volt was created as a vehicle designed to minimize gas use, and thus it’s not been marketed as a vehicle capable of self-charging. If you are really determined to drive your Volt on battery power (as opposed to gas-generated electricity), and have no opportunities to plug your Volt into the wall to get a charge, you can do this:

1. If the battery is fully depleted, switch to Mountain Mode, either while driving in moderate conditions or while parked. Within about 15 minutes, the Gen 1 battery will be recharged to the MM-maintained level (~4 bars, around 14-15 miles). The Gen 2 MM-maintained buffer is ~2 bars (~10-12 miles), so it might take less time.

2. Switch back to Normal. You might need to turn the Volt off and back on again to regain access to the use of this MM-recharged battery power. If you turn the car off and back on again, the distances driven on MM-recharged battery power will probably count as Electric Miles without changing the kWh Used numbers.

Using MM to recharge a fully depleted battery gives you an ev range of ~14 miles (Gen 1) or ~11 miles (Gen 2). Battery powered miles! For some, that might cover their daily commute.

3. If you have some wall battery power, or if you’re now running on MM-recharged power, each time your ev range drops to ~1 mile as you drive, switch to MM, then switch back to Normal after MM has recharged the battery to the MM-maintained level (10-15 minutes later). These MM-recharged battery miles may be recorded as Gas Miles, but they will be battery powered miles.

4. Note that using MM to recharge the Volt battery is the most fuel efficient way to run the Volt’s generator... the gas engine runs at maximum output until the battery is recharged (max fuel efficiency), rather than being turned off and on as needed to generate power as needed by the motor to push the car down the street.

Using MM to recharge your Volt battery whenever the ev range drops below one full bar will increase the portion of time you drive on battery power (as opposed to driving on gas-generated electricity). Your ev% and miles driven stats may become even more meaningless as more non-grid power battery miles are added to the Electric Miles totals rather than to the Gas Miles. I can’t begin to guess what effect MM-powered miles would have on the Gen 2's MPGe numbers because those numbers already ignore any regen created and used during the trip.

If you could use MM to fully recharge a fully depleted Gen 1 Volt battery, it would take about one gallon of gas to do so, i.e., the cost of recharging the Gen 1 battery via MM would be the price of a gallon of gas vs the cost of ~12 kWh of electricity from the wall (or whatever the cost at a public recharging station). I suspect it would take about 1.25 gallons of gas to fully recharge a fully depleted Gen 2 battery using MM (the price of 1.25 gallons of gas vs the cost of ~16.65 kWh of electricity from the wall). That might be a better price than using public recharging facilities, and it’s much faster.

Because it’s more fuel efficient to run the generator engine constantly to recharge the battery than to turn it on and off as needed while creating output to fuel the motor pushing the car down the road, using one gallon of gas to recharge the Gen 1 battery via MM would get you 35-38 ev miles (window sticker, full charge ev miles), whereas using one gallon of gas as you drive in Extended Range Mode would get you 37 mpg, i.e., just about the same.

For the Gen 2, using 1.25 gallons of gas to recharge the Gen 2 battery via MM if it were possible would get you 53 ev miles (window sticker, full charge ev miles), and using the same 1.25 gallons of gas to drive in Extended Range Mode would get you, @42 mpg, 52.5 miles, i.e., just about the same.

What has yet to be discussed is the impact, if any, frequent rapid recharging of the Volt battery by using Mountain Mode has on battery longevity.
 

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Many good ideas here.

Worst case you drive it like a hybrid and never plug it in, although even then you will probably run across occasional opportunities to do so.

Many casinos seem to have free charging. Enjoy the buffet and charge it up. Just stay away from the slots. A few stores have free charging too.

You'll get around 42 mpg driving as a hybrid which is still pretty darn good. It's not as good as a Prius but you are driving a much nicer car IMHO.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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you only need 6-8-12 amps at 120 volt - ( need a pilot mode for 6 amps )

All 3 new apts around me in Dallas have charging stations

I did not have too much trouble getting my OLD apts ( now a Condo) to let us use the 120 Volt ac power outlets in the parking area.
I do have to pay $10 a month.
 

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I've had my Volt for 5 years and rented 2 different apartments. I have convinced both landlords to install a 120V outlet for me... one split the cost and one just paid for it himself. I find large, corporate apartments generally don't want to work with you (though one was willing), but if you work with an individual landlord it's MUCH easier. Both my places were houses converted into apartments, so we had parking right next to the building anyway, and it wasn't very expense to run an outlet for me ($200-ish).

I will say, it can be a pain and does often limit your choices, but it's not impossible. Note that I am now looking at buying a condo and it's much harder there because you have a whole HOA to deal with. But if you find a place with it's own garage, then that makes it much easier. I try to always bring this up when talking to realtors or apartment complexes so that they will start to realize this is a growing customer demand. I was between places a few years ago (long story), and just didn't charge much for a few months... not ideal in terms of how we prefer to use our Volts, but it works fine that way and didn't add any stress to the already stressful situation like a pure EV would have.
 

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When we were renting in Houston for 15 months, had no problem finding an apartment with a garage that had a 120V outlet in it, but went a house with a 240V dryer outlet in the garage for level 2 charging, for not much more.
 

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Even if you can only charge up a couple of times a week, plugging in for five hours or so, that's still 105 EV miles a week. That might be more than half your weekly 180 miles of driving so you could still go 3-5 weeks between gasoline fillups. The gen2 Volt is a pretty good gasoline engined car at 42-43mpg. It also occurs to me that a 2019 Volt with 7.2kw charging would benefit someone in your situation since opportunistic charging over dinner or shopping errands would be twice as efficient.
 

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If you owned a BEV, you would have a serious problem, IMO. One of the great things about a Volt is that in your situation, the Volt still works. Just fill it with gas and drive it. It works fine. Sure it is probably not the car you would have chosen for this situation, but just continuing to drive it is probably a lot cheaper than trading the car or choosing a living arrangement that you would not have otherwise chosen, just for a plug. And eventually when your circumstances change again, maybe you will have easy charging again.
 

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If you owned a BEV, you would have a serious problem, IMO. One of the great things about a Volt is that in your situation, the Volt still works. Just fill it with gas and drive it. It works fine. Sure it is probably not the car you would have chosen for this situation, but just continuing to drive it is probably a lot cheaper than trading the car or choosing a living arrangement that you would not have otherwise chosen, just for a plug. And eventually when your circumstances change again, maybe you will have easy charging again.
Exactly!

Your Volt can accommodate your change in circumstances far better than any BEV could. And the plug will still he there for when you can use it.

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I'd say it's worth keeping if you can find a way to charge it fully at least 2 times per week. If you have off street parking, level 1 charging will be more than sufficient. I'd also see if there are any stores or parking garages near you with level 2 charging (most Whole Foods locations near me have 3+ charging stations). However, if you live in a city and only have access to street parking, I'd probably start to look at KBB values. With the tax credit and decent demand for the vehicle, you could probably recoup a pretty big chunk of your investment and put some of it back into a cheaper car that will be more easy to manage in the city.

If you live in some cities, the gov't will also subsidize or at least give you a permit to install a streetside charging station. Philadelphia was doing this some years ago but stopped when people started buying more electric cars just to get a guaranteed parallel parking space.
 

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I don't see the issue.

Just drive it like a hybrid, and plug in when you can. You'll likely find that you can still drive mostly electric miles.

Charging availability should only be a minor consideration. It's certainly not a big enough deal to trade in the car or live where you will have to drive more.
 
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