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The display on my 2018 Volt reads at the Most 42 miles of EV is that normal? The EPA says 53 but we have never seen it that high. Location SO CAL Summer 240v Level 2 Charger

I would be interested in knowing what other volt owners are seeing.


Thank you.
 

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That is just an estimate based on previous use (or so I understand).

In the summer I was getting 65-70 estimated range (warm but rarely use AC).
Now that it is much colder, my range (estimated and real) has dropped. It often says around 50 miles. So far that has not been a problem, it is still enough for most of my trips. I like to use the heat and need to have defrost going.
Mark
 

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Outside temperatures? My 2017 reads 44 most of the winter and will then move up to 60 or more in the summer.
 

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Anywhere from the high 20s to the low 70s depending on the weather and city/highway mix.

Cold weather reduces electric range by itself, and using the heat does even more. Highway driving above about 65 MPH sharply reduces the range due to aerodynamic drag. Moderate weather conditions with city driving are the best for range, cold weather with high-speed highway driving are the worst. The mileage remaining is effectively just an educated guess.
 

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Any highway driving produces drag, just stick you hand out the window at 55 mph. Air drag goes up with the square of speed (or something like that) not linearly. Speed can be less noticeable with ICE because it has a sweet spot that is designed in usually between 2,000 and 4,000 rpm. Electric motors don't have that being more efficient at low rpm with decreasing efficiency as it rises. A/C is more efficient than heating. Fans don't use a lot of electricity (compared to a heating element). Greater acceleration takes more energy than less even though it might be required for a less amount of time. Lubrication is thicker at lower temperatures so requires more energy to overcome the increased friction. All factors to range (there are more).
 

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Any highway driving produces drag, just stick you hand out the window at 55 mph. Air drag goes up with the square of speed (or something like that) not linearly. Speed can be less noticeable with ICE because it has a sweet spot that is designed in usually between 2,000 and 4,000 rpm. Electric motors don't have that being more efficient at low rpm with decreasing efficiency as it rises. A/C is more efficient than heating. Fans don't use a lot of electricity (compared to a heating element). Greater acceleration takes more energy than less even though it might be required for a less amount of time. Lubrication is thicker at lower temperatures so requires more energy to overcome the increased friction. All factors to range (there are more).
ALL THE ABOVE:

I am in the flatlands of Illinois. We have mostly flat land with gentle hills, not even bumps.
in the summer, 70-80 deg F temps ambient, I can get up to 83 miles after charge.
First, you won't jump from 40 miles to 83 miles overnight. It takes many charges to recompute all the
info the VOLT considers when making the estimate, and the jump won't be more than 3 miles added after
a charge, per charge. SO you have to work your way up with good driving.

I am not a great AIR CON person and the temperatures here are generally moderate so I don't put the
Air Con on and normally have the fan shut down.

I don't think I work hard to achieve this 83 mile bench mark. I don't do jack rabbit starts, I don't slam
on the brake coming to stop signs/lights.
Though tempted, I try not to show the little noisy SPICER next to me at the light that a VOLT can move
out like no ones business when it needs to.
I do what I consider normal speed pick ups from stop, I use D for drive, and cruise control as much as
possible.
Where safe and little to no traffic, I tend to kick off the cruise when approaching a stop sign/light and let
the regen do it's magic. A little bit of regen goes a long way, and coasting in regen is also accumulating miles
in memory over the length of your trip. The more you drive (regen) the more miles accumulate which affects
the Guess-O-Meter.
My top speed on electric would generally be around 45 mph but you find your best travel speeds are under 40.
I tend to charge whenever the car is home to keep the battery up. I have only ran out of battery twice that
I can think of.
Driving your mileage down to near 0 may give you the better mileage charge ratings, but I tend to think it is harder on
the battery... just speculation as I don't have anything in black and white yet, but we are all in for battery
longevity.
I don't have ACC, missed it by two weeks, but if you are on the highway, in cruise control, with the shifter in L,
you will find if the car detects something in front of you and warns you (flashing light and beep), it also kicks
off the cruise which when in L will kick in the aggressive regen and the car will begin to slow rather quickly.
This warns you to hit the brakes if needed, a good reminder I'd think.
I have NOT attained the high 80's miles est when using L so I feel the aggressive regen is too little to
make a difference...
 

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64 in summer, down to 31 in winter.
Fill your tires (I run at 39 psi. The manual says 36)
Turn off the heat in the morning (you average 65, do you really need to bump it up to 72?)
Turn down the A/C (do you really need it to be 70?)
Turn off auto-defrost (I rarely need it, but then, I don't live next to an ocean)
Slow down (70+ mph tanks your range, and you only get back about half the energy you use getting up to speed)
Drive on flat ground, or only downhill (that's a tough one, I'll admit)
Did I mention fill your tires?
 
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