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What you said was "Level 2 charging is 24 amps total, 12 amps on each 120VAC line." That is doubling the actual current that flows from one hot wire to the other hot wire. There is no neutral. In fact, as an example, there isn't even a neutral wire in a NEMA 10-30 outlet. There are NOT two independent circuits.

That is incorrect. If either hot wire is disconnected, no current will flow. And 2880 watts for 4.5 hrs would only be putting 11.7kWh into your battery at 90% efficiency. You have a larger usable battery than that. You even said something to the effect that the numbers don't add up.

Unless you are using the OEM EVSE (which limits current to 12A regardless of voltage) with an adapter on a 240V outlet, or have a rare EVSE that allows you to select 12A as a max current, I can't even imagine such a measurement. Your 2018 will never limit you to 12A on a normal L2 EVSE. What kind of meter are you using the measure the current? Gen1 Volts on an L2 EVSE charge at 3.3kW, and Gen2 at 3.84kW I believe (except 2019). That is 240 V x 16A.
You are correct. I should've spoken in wattage terms. I made it more confusing then it had to be. I apologize for that. 240VAC doesn't require the neutral; so, it would be 240x12=2880. For some reason I was thinking of my RV which does have 240vac input and does use the neutral. Please accept my apology.
 

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What you said was "Level 2 charging is 24 amps total, 12 amps on each 120VAC line." That is doubling the actual current that flows from one hot wire to the other hot wire. There is no neutral. In fact, as an example, there isn't even a neutral wire in a NEMA 10-30 outlet. There are NOT two independent circuits.

That is incorrect. If either hot wire is disconnected, no current will flow. And 2880 watts for 4.5 hrs would only be putting 11.7kWh into your battery at 90% efficiency. You have a larger usable battery than that. You even said something to the effect that the numbers don't add up.

Unless you are using the OEM EVSE (which limits current to 12A regardless of voltage) with an adapter on a 240V outlet, or have a rare EVSE that allows you to select 12A as a max current, I can't even imagine such a measurement. Your 2018 will never limit you to 12A on a normal L2 EVSE. What kind of meter are you using the measure the current? Gen1 Volts on an L2 EVSE charge at 3.3kW, and Gen2 at 3.84kW I believe (except 2019). That is 240 V x 16A.
I double checked my clamp meter and through it in the trash. It's not only inaccurate, it was intermittent. Garbage.
 

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Umm, that is literally exactly what you said: "Level 2 charging is 24 amps total, 12 amps on each 120VAC line"

The two 120 V A/C lines don't run at 12 amps each. When you measure one wire against the other, the total amperage is 12, not 24.

Watts = volts x amps

Therefore, if you simply double the voltage, you double the watts.

Energy transferred = watts x time (usually expressed as kilowatt hours).

So, if you double the voltage and leave the amperage the same, the amount of time it will take to transfer a given amount of energy (such as that required to charge the Volt's battery) will be halved.

My understanding is that this is exactly what happens if you use the OEM EVSE plugged into 240V instead of 120V. It will take 6 hr to give the Volt a full charge - half the 12 hr it takes at 120 V/12 amps. The Volt is capable of charging at 16 amps but the OEM EVSE is limited to 12 amps. So charging with an aftermarket 240 V EVSE results in faster charging (4.5 hr) because those EVSEs can charge at 16 amps.



It should be ~6 hr on the oem evse at 240 V and 12 amps, and it is a bit more than 4 hr on an aftermarket level 2 evse at 240 V and 16 amps
That's not what I said in the quotation the he provided. I did say that by mistake on an earlier post which I retracted and apologized for. Peace✌
 

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Hello, you will be charged about 5 hours plus minus I think that more than 5 hours will not take time, I charge with a 45V charger and I have 4 hours, so you will have something like 5 hours, unfortunately, it will be a lot, but you have to wait
 

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... how long it will take my 2018 Volt to charge from empty to full if I use 240volts (with appropriate adapter) and my OEM EVSE? ....
Doing it this way your stock EVSE will be 240V @ 12A which is 2.8 kW.
The car is capable of charging at 240V @ 16A, or ~3.6 kW.
Do the math for what the car is supposed to do on a proper L2.
It will be temp dependent because TMS will use some power in very cold conditions.

It's not that expensive to get a proper L2 so you don't have that potentially dangerous adapter lurking in your garage.
 

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Doing it this way your stock EVSE will be 240V @ 12A which is 2.8 kW.
The car is capable of charging at 240V @ 16A, or ~3.6 kW.
Do the math for what the car is supposed to do on a proper L2.
It will be temp dependent because TMS will use some power in very cold conditions.

It's not that expensive to get a proper L2 so you don't have that potentially dangerous adapter lurking in your garage.
Plus the cell balancing cycle, if called for, takes the same amount of time to do whether on 120v or 240v. That balance cycle is and isn't accounted for in various charging-time related figuring that the car does, and that contributes to some of the confusing things the car does with regard to departure-time-delayed charging.
 

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Plus the cell balancing cycle, if called for, takes the same amount of time to do whether on 120v or 240v. That balance cycle is and isn't accounted for in various charging-time related figuring that the car does, and that contributes to some of the confusing things the car does with regard to departure-time-delayed charging.
my 2016 batteries got to 50mv out of balance and that may be from charging only the top half of the batteries and at 240v
drained the batteries and charged the batteries at 120v for the whole weekend
check it later that week and had returned to 12mv balance. slower charge must give it more time to balance ?
 

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Can someone tell me how long it will take my 2018 Volt to charge from empty to full if I use 240volts (with appropriate adapter) and my OEM EVSE? It takes about 12 hours using 110 volts. Also, if I do use 240 volts, does anyone know how many amps it will draw? 16????

I ask this because I have read several of the threads on how to do be this and it seems to me it will be very easy to use my unused clothes dryer recepticle. I will buy a new dryer cord, which is color coded and connect each hot (120v) to a side of hospital grade RED 120v 20amp outlet. And of course connect dryer ground to the RED outlet ground. Am I missing something here???
The charger that comes with your Volt is rated for 110 to 220. I had a 220 outlet and purchased a female 110 and wired it to the appropriate male 220 plug. I would set the vehicle to charge at 12 amps and the charge would generally take 4 hours. I don’t recollect if that was from “empty.” I am guessing that was usually when the vehicle had 12-24 miles of range left in the battery. But bottom line - it made life wonderful. Your dryer outlet will work. There are plenty of threads on how to make the adapter.
 

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Can someone tell me how long it will take my 2018 Volt to charge from empty to full if I use 240volts (with appropriate adapter) and my OEM EVSE? It takes about 12 hours using 110 volts. Also, if I do use 240 volts, does anyone know how many amps it will draw? 16????

I ask this because I have read several of the threads on how to do be this and it seems to me it will be very easy to use my unused clothes dryer recepticle. I will buy a new dryer cord, which is color coded and connect each hot (120v) to a side of hospital grade RED 120v 20amp outlet. And of course connect dryer ground to the RED outlet ground. Am I missing something here???
Just buy a level II charger and forget all the other nonsense.
 

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Can someone tell me how long it will take my 2018 Volt to charge from empty to full if I use 240volts (with appropriate adapter) and my OEM EVSE? It takes about 12 hours using 110 volts. Also, if I do use 240 volts, does anyone know how many amps it will draw? 16????

I ask this because I have read several of the threads on how to do be this and it seems to me it will be very easy to use my unused clothes dryer recepticle. I will buy a new dryer cord, which is color coded and connect each hot (120v) to a side of hospital grade RED 120v 20amp outlet. And of course connect dryer ground to the RED outlet ground. Am I missing something here???
It takes my 2017 Volt just over 4 hrs from drained to full at a level 2 charging rate. My Charger is a Clipper Creek Rated for a Tesla on a 50amp breaker. It is not hardwired as it plugs into a NEMA 1450 receptacle.
If you are questioning your electrical prowess, please have a qualified and licensed electrician wire it up for you. We would hate to see you injured or damage yoir hole!🇺🇸
Can someone tell me how long it will take my 2018 Volt to charge from empty to full if I use 240volts (with appropriate adapter) and my OEM EVSE? It takes about 12 hours using 110 volts. Also, if I do use 240 volts, does anyone know how many amps it will draw? 16????

I ask this because I have read several of the threads on how to do be this and it seems to me it will be very easy to use my unused clothes dryer recepticle. I will buy a new dryer cord, which is color coded and connect each hot (120v) to a side of hospital grade RED 120v 20amp outlet. And of course connect dryer ground to the RED outlet ground. Am I missing something here???
It takes my 2017 Volt just over 4 hrs from drained to full at a level 2 charging rate. My Charger is a Clipper Creek HCS-60 JuiceBox on a 50 amp breaker. It is not hardwired as it plugs into a NEMA 1450 receptacle.
If you are questioning your electrical prowess, please have a qualified and licensed electrician wire it up for you. We would hate to see you injured or damage your house🇺🇸
 

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It takes my 2017 Volt just over 4 hrs from drained to full at a level 2 charging rate. My Charger is a Clipper Creek Rated for a Tesla on a 50amp breaker. It is not hardwired as it plugs into a NEMA 1450 receptacle.

It takes my 2017 Volt just over 4 hrs from drained to full at a level 2 charging rate. My Charger is a Clipper Creek HCS-60 JuiceBox on a 50 amp breaker. It is not hardwired as it plugs into a NEMA 1450 receptacle.
Regardless of whether your EVSE is on a 50A breaker or a 30A breaker, the car controls the flow, not the breaker. Also, Clipper Creek and Juice Box are competitors. so what is a "Clipper Creek HCS-60 JuiceBox"? Like saying a "Chevy Silverado Ford F150", it makes no sense to me,
 

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I know you said you measured it at 12 amps each line for a total of 24 amps. But, it was my understanding that 16 amps is the MAX the onboard charger will allow. As far as I know, I am charging my 2018 at 16 amps and it also takes 4.5 hours.
Can anyone confirm if the onboard charger on a 2018 will charge at 24 amps?
No, 2018 is still 16A. I think in the last year, 2019, 24A was available but not sure if standard. 4.5 hours from empty to full at 16A , 230V. With tThe charger is really a dumb animal, delivering single-phase AC power, except that it looks for a good ground and sends the simple PWM signal. The boosting of voltage, from 120 or 240VAC to about 325VDC is handled by the charger on board the car.
 
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