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I had a 2012 Volt Premier and loved it once GM fixed a weird problem caused by the dealer over filling the gas tank... I skipped the next model year when my lease was over because it there wasn't really a 2016 except in California. I very happily rejoined the Volt family two weeks ago with a white 2017 premier.

This past weekend while on a 200 mile r/t drive I had a tire go flat/blow. I pulled over to the edge of the breakdown land/shoulder and remembered there was no spare but a sealant compressor device.

I connected it and started it up and nothing seemed to be happening and I waited quite a while. I re-read the manual, not something I really wanted to do at that point, but all seemed to be correct. However it said something about turning the sealant canister to lock it into the top of the compressor. I thought lets see if its seated correctly. With cars wizzing by at 75-80 the sealant canister "exploded" in my face. Luckily I didn't react and jump in the wrong direction or I would be a hood ornament now. Also luckily I had sunglasses on or I might have walked into traffic. After my adrenaline subsided ai put everything in a plastic bag, called onstar and got the car towed to a dealership.

Anything can happen within the first 500 miles. Don't wait to put together the repair kits people here talk about.

I'm a reasonably intelligent guy whose been on the planet for more than 60 years, and I do NOT think this Rube Goldberg device --with canisters that don't stay in place, multiple hoses, a power source that barely reaches the back tires when plugged into the back seat cigarette lighter, and requiring close reading in the middle of what may be hazardous conditions -- is anywhere near acceptable.

I'm sure many people have used the sealant successfully, but either I had a defective canister, hose, connection, or something OR its simply an over-thought, under-designed/engineered POS device on an otherwise wonderfully designed car.

If you haven't had a flat in your Volt or other car without a spare, plan ahead and do as many others here suggest: create a tire patch kit, be sure to have the right type of road service, and a tire warranty.
 

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The tire sealant compressor setup is a joke. Best to never use it and just carry (good) roadside assistance. ( or carry an good old style patch plug kit, which if done properly will last the life of the tire )


If you had successfully used it, you still have to replace the tire and the TPMS and you'll also piss off the tech who has to remove and replace the tire as he also gets a face full of what you did. AND it is only a temporary fix as you are only supposed to drive for less than 100 miles.

Not having a spare as a cost/weight saving measure is total BS.

Also before I turned in my 2015 my local dealership helpfully removed the canister of sealant from my compressor and never replaced it ( expired? ). Glad I never needed it.
 

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I carry a professional repair plug kit with pliers and needle snips. I also carry a can of fix a flat just in case I am not with my wife. I couldn't care less about gumming up something if it gets her home safe and sound.
 

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I carry a professional repair plug kit with pliers and needle snips. I also carry a can of fix a flat just in case I am not with my wife. I couldn't care less about gumming up something if it gets her home safe and sound.
Can you offer the name of the kit you have and where you can get it from?

Cheers.
 

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I have carried a flat repair kit, pliers, plastic sheet, gloves, and flashlight in my Volt since week 1 in May 2011. I also familiarized myself with how the air compressor and sealant work. I don't want to be trying to figure this stuff out on the side of the road in an emergency. I like to be prepared, but to each their own.

P.S. The Bolt EV tires are self sealing for nail punctures.
 

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Hi,
Doesn't anyone know of a small, compact, spare that is available for the Gen 1 Volts? I've seen the very creative approaches to putting a full size spare and attaching to the rear seat, but I'm thinking that might be overkill. I plan to carry a patch kit, plus a can of the Slime sealant and a hydraulic jack vs. a scissor jack, but a physical compact spare, I would think would be ideal.
 

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I had one of these "blow up" all over my driveway. What I can say is that the latex used in the GM fix-a-flat canisters comes right off the TPMS sensors and the inside of the tire, unlike Slime's green goo.

My caution on these is to ensure you never have the pump's air hose plugged into them when not in use.
 

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Hi,
Doesn't anyone know of a small, compact, spare that is available for the Gen 1 Volts? I've seen the very creative approaches to putting a full size spare and attaching to the rear seat, but I'm thinking that might be overkill. I plan to carry a patch kit, plus a can of the Slime sealant and a hydraulic jack vs. a scissor jack, but a physical compact spare, I would think would be ideal.
The 2003-2007 Cadillac CTS compact spare fits. Check out this thread:
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?48058-Volt-Spare-Tire-Guide
It may be tough to find a hydraulic jack that will fit under your Volt, especially if you have a flat tire. The scissor jack flattens out enough to get under the car and it can be stored under the trunk floor.
Also note that there are 2 styles of spares that fit. The 5 spoke aluminum spare will fit on the front or the rear. The solid steel wheel spare will only fit on the rear wheels.
 
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