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I have a 2017 volt. I have been trying to find out if the gas engine cylinder walls have steels sleeves in the aluminum engine. i am worried about the chevy vega syndrome. Any one know the answer.
 

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It's a cast iron block engine.
 

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I have a 2017 volt. I have been trying to find out if the gas engine cylinder walls have steels sleeves in the aluminum engine. i am worried about the chevy vega syndrome. Any one know the answer.
The Jag XKE has the same problem with nickel coated cylinder walls on its aluminum V8. A number of engines were replaced and they soon went to steel sleeves. The problem wasn't the coated cylinder walls so much as it was with the sulphur content in the gasoline. When the engine was turned off the sulphur would form into sulphuric acid and eat the lining. Those areas that had low sulphur content never had a problem. The amount of sulphur that could be in gasoline was mandated nation wide to a very low level and no problems were reported after that. If your engine made it through that period, it would be fine now. Urban legends die hard (although I don't know if that classifies as a truly urban legend).
 

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That's the Gen1 1.4L engine. The Gen2 uses a direct injection 1.5L engine.
 

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The 2nd generation engine is completely cast aluminum. 1.5 cubic inch. The first generation(2010-2015) were 1.4 cast iron blocked engines. Totally different engines.
The 2nd generation engine is completely cast aluminum. 1.5 cubic inch. The first generation(2010-2015) were 1.4 cast iron blocked engines. Totally different engines.
The 2nd generation engine is completely cast aluminum. 1.5 cubic inch. The first generation(2010-2015) were 1.4 cast iron blocked engines. Totally different engines.
I meant to type 1.5 litre instead of cubic inch- my bad
 

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I meant to type 1.5 litre instead of cubic inch- my bad
If you click on the 3 vertically aligned dots in the upper right hand corner of your post, you should be offered the opportunity to edit your post. I assume that option shows up for new members with only a few posts.
 

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I too , have not been able to find out the cylinder wall composition. I did find it interesting that the cylinder and head were one piece like aero engines. Hey, at 12:1 compression ratio a head gasket is a liability. And the fact that the block was ALSO integrated into that same casting is pretty amazing casting and machining technology.
 

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I have a 2017 volt. I have been trying to find out if the gas engine cylinder walls have steels sleeves in the aluminum engine. i am worried about the chevy vega syndrome. Any one know the answer.
I drove my 1971 Vega for 96,000 miles before it died with a cracked block due to my putting too much water in with the coolant one winter (my bad). I had to replace the valve-guide oil seals at 45,000 miles due to burning too much oil. I had to replace a piston at 90,000 miles due to a cracked skirt. Other that those two things, my Vega gave me no trouble. Well, setting the valve lash per the recommended intervals was somewhat of a chore.
 

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I have a 2017 volt. I have been trying to find out if the gas engine cylinder walls have steels sleeves in the aluminum engine. i am worried about the chevy vega syndrome. Any one know the answer.
They are sleeved. To my knowledge, GM has not made aluminum cylinders since the Vega. The sleeves are cast in place.
 

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I have a 2017 volt. I have been trying to find out if the gas engine cylinder walls have steels sleeves in the aluminum engine. i am worried about the chevy vega syndrome. Any one know the answer.
Oh that brings back memories. I had a ‘75 Vega hatchback in high school. Started it with a screwdriver and had a manual pull choke on the carb. Never had engine issues. Now I need to worry about my Volt. Yikes!
 

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The problem with the Vega engine at the beginning was with the coolant escaping out the cap due to no overflow bottle being provided…a few pennies saved in the manufacturing costs. That bit GM in the you-know-where when engines were warping, etc., overheating due to lack of coolant. The iron head mated to the aluminum block didn’t help.

If I recall the process correctly, the molten aluminum had some silicon mixed in. The cylinders were specially honed* to cause the silicon crystals to be microscopically raised above the aluminum to allow oil to remain in the void, providing lubrication for the piston. Porsche tried the same thing with the V-8 in the 928, IIRC.

When I had my engine apart at 90,000 miles, the cylinder walls and piston skirts were slightly worn due to piston thrust, but, wear was within allowable limits.

Edit: *acid etched, too, I believe
 

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Another neat thing about the Vega was the method of shipping the cars from the factory on trains. The train cars had fork lifts designed into the sides of the train car. The Vegas were driven onto the lifts and the lifts rotated vertically to trap the cars in the "box car" with the front of the Vegas facing down. A new type of 12v battery was designed to prevent the battery fluid from leaking out the caps when tilted 90 degrees.
 
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