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Seafoam fuel treatment instead?
I'm curious about the cause of the build-up. Didi they tell you anything about what caused it to be needed?
All direct injection gasoline engines have this problem.
Because the fuel is injected directly into the combustion chambers, and NOT into the intake.
The fuel, therefore does not wash the back of the valves so they build up with carbon.

Some manufacturers recommend walnut shell blasting as maintenance.. which in some cases requires cylinder head removal.

One manufacturer has added a single injector in the intake specifically to try keep the valves clean.

summary.. fuel additives won't work. If they did.. the fuel itself would do the job.


IMO, Direct iniection gas engines suck because of this design problem.


You would have to have the means of revving the engine while stationary, probably with commands through the OBDII port. It's something that I don't know how to do.
If it were me, I'd have the dealer do the deed
Correct. I have yet to investigate how this is done with a motor where you don't have controll of the throttle.
Advanced scan tools allow direct throttle control but I haven't had time to see if this option is there for the Voltec drivetrain.
 

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I know a lot of car enthusiasts that own vehicles with GDI's install oil catch cans or an air/oil separators to reduce build up on the valves. I installed one on my previous vehicle. You'd be surprised how much crap it traps. Maybe an oil catch can or an air/oil separator would also help reduce build up in the EGR system?

This is what a lot of people swear by to clean GDI intakes.
Liquid Fluid Bottle cap Bottle Drink
 

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I know a lot of car enthusiasts that own vehicles with GDI's install oil catch cans or an air/oil separators to reduce build up on the valves. I installed one on my previous vehicle. You'd be surprised how much crap it traps. Maybe an oil catch can or an air/oil separator would also help reduce build up in the EGR system?

This is what a lot of people swear by to clean GDI intakes.
View attachment 173070
I have thought about that stuff, but in the Volt you can't control the throttle, so I'm not sure how easy it would be.
 

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I suspect an oil catch can would help.
They are a somewhat common mod in the Subaru world, even for non GDI motors.
Much better to have one, but requires maintenance. I have seen some where people forget to empty them.

The ultimate solution would be a modified EGR valve that effectively is a fake and fools the system while not allowing the engine to overheat.

In the meantime. I think that periodic EGR valve cleaning would help immensely.
 

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I suspect an oil catch can would help.
They are a somewhat common mod in the Subaru world, even for non GDI motors.
Much better to have one, but requires maintenance. I have seen some where people forget to empty them.

The ultimate solution would be a modified EGR valve that effectively is a fake and fools the system while not allowing the engine to overheat.

In the meantime. I think that periodic EGR valve cleaning would help immensely.
This is what I had on my previous vehicle(Kia Stinger GT). Set it and forget it. No maintenance/emptying required. Works similar to an air/oil separator. Took me 5 minutes to install. Maybe something like this exists for our Volt.

 

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Maybe an oil catch can or an air/oil separator would also help reduce build up in the EGR system?
Is your theory there is that if less oil comes into the cylinder, less carbon will be in the exhaust to build up? Interesting thought.

The really bad build up on GDI engines happens right at the valves because many engines run significant valve overlap to 'fake' EGR (intake reversion) in cruising conditions (dual variable valve timing engines). Basically, some of the air/exhaust that was in the cylinder goes up the intake ports an inch or two or three, which give it a chance to 'condense' on the (relatively) cold intake runners and valves. On engines with dedicated EGR systems, this build up would happen over the complete EGR and intake tract.

The EGR issue on the Volt engine really seems like a manufacturing issue with the electronics, not a build-up issue. A clogged EGR valve shouldn't blow a fuse - but a shorted EGR control solenoid would...

-Charlie
 

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Can anyone confirm if the new EGR valves dealerships are placing in the Volts now are an updated version?
 

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I have used the CRC and most of it seemed to go into a resonator in the intake tube. Then it seemed to get sucked into the engine in big slugs and the engine was not happy. It was so not happy that I immediately abandoned use of it, turned off the engine, disassembled the intake tube assembly and drained it all out. I have used seafoam and stuff before and I know how grumpy engines sound when ingesting it...this was far worse. I won't try it again.
 

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Hello ,
I am new to this forum , not new with chevy volt , i own a 2016 with 48000 miles , i had the reduced propulsion warning about a year ago , took to dealership and it was a valve sensor that watches the oil pressure to the top end , failing at 42000 , they cover it under warranty ,
Second reduced propulsion warning came about 2 weeks ago , this time i use a scanner and saw the several codes associate to the famous egr failure , dealership do not cover the failure , and no egr , went into survival mode , i remove the valve , took 15 minutes , no excess carbon , check the coil board and it was shorted , causing the walk home fuse to blow , there is a reason why an ennginner called it that way , this fuse also cover several parts of the ecm sensors ,causing to overheat the engine and not allowing you to drive in ICE , sooo i reinstalled the valve and left unplugged , replace the fuse , and clear the codes , drove on ice for 10 miles with no issues , only check engine light is for the missing egr . I am all about being legal with emissions devices etc , but since there is no part to replace it with in this country , and i believe gm should have a recall on this issue , i will drive with no egr and i may say that i will benefit from the 50 MPG!!! Usually i have been getting 42 to 44 MPG , i have tested for 480 miles , and i hand calculated with three fill ups , the car respond alot smoother , no jurking transitions between traction battery to ICE and viceversa , my main purpose of comunicating this is to help so many volt owners outthere not able to drive the vehicle and being told its a 1600 dollar repair , its outgrageous when the valve is 244 dollars , i found one overseas in ebay , and only takes half hour to replace , if you are a little handy , i will keep driving it with no egr untill gm does the right thing and cover the part and labor , i hope i help to clear the difference bettwen a shorted egr and a clogged egr , the second can be cleaned and the certain codes with clear , the first you cant drive it due to tge blown fuse , so unplug it , repkace fuse and enjoy tge driving ,
 

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Good information Jackal. In the early 1970's it was common to de-activate ( put a ball bearing in the vacuum line:censored:) the lousy vacuum operated EGR valves of the time and just leave them in place until the next smog check. That your mileage improved is consistent with higher peak combustion temperatures. It would be interesting to see how your fuel trims changed. ( if any ) .
 

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I dont have the software to monitor the fuel trims , i am lookong for one at the moment , the egr from the 70's being only vacuum operated was alot easier to work on or replaced , but yeah i heard about people putting ball bearings , whatever to keep the valve closed , too much electronics these days .
Been watching the engine temp and it runs between 203 to 210 , not a problem.
 

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Good information Jackal. In the early 1970's it was common to de-activate ( put a ball bearing in the vacuum line:censored:) the lousy vacuum operated EGR valves of the time and just leave them in place until the next smog check. That your mileage improved is consistent with higher peak combustion temperatures. It would be interesting to see how your fuel trims changed. ( if any ) .
yep, I've got an '87 Trans Am and GM decided to stop making the EGR solenoid, so I put a block-off plate where the valve was and it's been fine for the past decade.
 

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sooo i reinstalled the valve and left unplugged , replace the fuse , and clear the codes , drove on ice for 10 miles with no issues , only check engine light is for the missing egr . I am all about being legal with emissions devices etc , but since there is no part to replace it with in this country , and i believe gm should have a recall on this issue , i will drive with no egr and i may say that i will benefit from the 50 MPG!!!
@Thejackal1963 or anyone, would it be possible to post how you replaced the fuse? (Note: I found a great video on cleaning the EGR valve here:
...just doesn't show how to remove the valve as thoroughly)
 

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@Thejackal1963 or anyone, would it be possible to post how you replaced the fuse? (Note: I found a great video on cleaning the EGR valve here:
...just doesn't show how to remove the valve as thoroughly)
It's the F03 fuse in the fuse box under the hood (pinch the tabs together to remove the cover). I had a pic with an arrow drawn on it but I must have deleted it.
 
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