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Does anyone know if the ERG valve is a third-party unit? In searching for the 4024770 code, it seems the BMW also may use this part, judging from the picture of the part in it’s bulletin.

In any event, it appears that a stuck ERG valve is an event shared among many types of vehicles.
 

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On the long weekend I had the all too familiar EGR (short circuit) failure which takes out fuse F3 and thus causes a whole host of other issues like overheating. Luckily I limped home on battery but last few miles felt really sluggish.

This EGR valve was installed Dec 29/15 as a replacement to the original part. Car was delivered Oct/15 and by December a check engine light said I needed a new tranny. Tech was not sure if if was defective EGR valve or he could have damaged it dropping the engined out of the car to swap the tranny, in any case this is my 3 rd EGR valve.

Even though entire repair was covered under emissions warranty I wonder why so many of these EGR valves are failing? From previous posts there seems to be a big shortage of EGR replacements so I’m wondering if the shortage was caused by a redesign of the part ( all seem to be failing the same way). No information on this aspect that I could find, just my suspicion.

Does anyone know if this EGR design has been changed recently?
 

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Add me to the list. My wife's CEL lit up on her 2017, after she got a reduced propulsion notification. She was out-of-town helping her mother with her grandfathers funeral arrangements. Couldn't have happened at a worse time. The local Chevy dealer swapped in a new F3 fuse and sent her on her way. She made it about 30 miles before she got the same CEL and Reduced Propulsion. Car ran hot (~230-240F). She ran the heater in the car to help bleed some heat, and she made it home (120 mile trip). Same F3 fuse was burned out. I think the car has just under 50k total miles, maybe 25% of that is on the ICE.
These are the codes:
P0030 - O2 sensor air fuel ratio
P0443 - EVAP system purge valve or its control circuit
P0458 - Evaporative Emission System Purge Control Valve Circuit Low Input
P0403 - Engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) circuit has malfunctioned
P0489 - ECM has detected a fault with an electrical component of the EGR system
P0597 - Engine's thermostat is experiencing an issue with the control voltage
P0598 - Fault involving the thermostat heater control circuit
P06DA - Oil pressure control circuit
P06DB - vague powertrain code...not sure

So we're pretty sure it's the same EGR BS affecting lots of other Gen2 Volts. I'll try cleaning it and report back.
Also, I wonder if these little 1.5L turds need a Seafoam or some other fuel treatment periodically.
 

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Spent 1/2 my day removing, cleaning and reinstalling the EGR, which was pretty coked-up. The cleaning went well, but no dice, it's still burning out the F3 fuse and then overheating. This sucks. Really don't want to give money to GM right now, especially to reward their under-engineered garbage parts supply chain.
 

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I'm sorry this hasn't worked out for you. Bummer. In the interests of furthering the collective knowledge, how would you feel about removing the clips that are holding the black cover for the electronics and looking for burnt components? Pictures would be helpful.
In searching for the chevy volt egr valve, I came across this site: OEM EGR Valve Assembly 12674163 12667038 12691147 Fit 2016-2018 Chevrolet Ecotec | eBay
You may want to go this route.
Good luck and please keep us updated.
 
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I'm sorry this hasn't worked out for you. Bummer. In the interests of furthering the collective knowledge, how would you feel about removing the clips that are holding the black cover for the electronics and looking for burnt components? Pictures would be helpful.
In searching for the chevy volt egr valve, I came across this site: OEM EGR Valve Assembly 12674163 12667038 12691147 Fit 2016-2018 Chevrolet Ecotec | eBay
You may want to go this route.
Good luck and please keep us updated.
I have wondered myself, if maybe there's a bad solder joint or something in there.

As far as the carbon buildup, I suspect it's worse for people who never let their engines fully warm up. The direct injected engines run really rich when they are cold. If all you do is run it for a mile or two before shutting it off, I can see the carbon building up very quickly.
 

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Add me to the list. My wife's CEL lit up on her 2017, after she got a reduced propulsion notification. She was out-of-town helping her mother with her grandfathers funeral arrangements. Couldn't have happened at a worse time. The local Chevy dealer swapped in a new F3 fuse and sent her on her way. She made it about 30 miles before she got the same CEL and Reduced Propulsion. Car ran hot (~230-240F). She ran the heater in the car to help bleed some heat, and she made it home (120 mile trip). Same F3 fuse was burned out. I think the car has just under 50k total miles, maybe 25% of that is on the ICE.
These are the codes:
P0030 - O2 sensor air fuel ratio
P0443 - EVAP system purge valve or its control circuit
P0458 - Evaporative Emission System Purge Control Valve Circuit Low Input
P0403 - Engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) circuit has malfunctioned
P0489 - ECM has detected a fault with an electrical component of the EGR system
P0597 - Engine's thermostat is experiencing an issue with the control voltage
P0598 - Fault involving the thermostat heater control circuit
P06DA - Oil pressure control circuit
P06DB - vague powertrain code...not sure

So we're pretty sure it's the same EGR BS affecting lots of other Gen2 Volts. I'll try cleaning it and report back.
Also, I wonder if these little 1.5L turds need a Seafoam or some other fuel treatment periodically.
They should have unplugged the EGR before replacing the fuse, then it wouldn't have blown again. I haven't had the issue myself (yet), but I bought a pack of fuses to keep in the car, just in case.
 

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I have wondered myself, if maybe there's a bad solder joint or something in there.

As far as the carbon buildup, I suspect it's worse for people who never let their engines fully warm up. The direct injected engines run really rich when they are cold. If all you do is run it for a mile or two before shutting it off, I can see the carbon building up very quickly.
With DI engines periodic use of Seafoam (or other such) motor treatment is a necessary maintenance task, I believe. Otherwise the buildup of crud around the valves will make the engine stumble eventually.
 
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Exactly the same issue for me a few weeks ago and when reading all the EGR failures they seem to have a common problem, an internal short causing F3 to blow, and thereby causing all the other systems on the same fuse to stop working. There seemed to be a big shortage of EGR replacements for a while, I‘m wondering if there was a redesign of the part at that time.
 

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In any event, it appears that a stuck ERG valve is an event shared among many types of vehicles.
I suspect that all are direct injection motors.

From previous posts there seems to be a big shortage of EGR replacements so I’m wondering if the shortage was caused by a redesign of the part ( all seem to be failing the same way).
The shortage is likely due to how many they are replacing. With the vehicle no longer in production, and the parts required are exceeding their planned supply. Current COVID related production issues for many other parts is likely making it worse.

(A few years ago there was a big shortage of alternators for both the Suzuki SX4 and Fiat 500, due to crappy mounting location+design. We had a 1 year old car, sit in our lot, for 7 weeks waiting for the part, backordered globally. A national parts guy said that dealers all over North America were waiting/fighting for them. He liked me and expedited one meant for a dealer's stock.... and people wonder why make friends with parts suppliers. hehe)

Also, I wonder if these little 1.5L turds need a Seafoam or some other fuel treatment periodically.
Fuel treatment is likely not going to help much.
DI motors build up carbon very quickly because the fuel isn't washing the back of the valves like non-direct injection motors. That cause issues with valves not sealing etc.
It is now official VW and Ford and Subaru and * and * and scheduled service procedure to blast clean the valves. In some cases that requires cylinder head removal, in other cases not. Pretty ugly unusual service that wasn't an issue before DI.
"Hello sir... I see you are in for your cylinder head removal maintenance"

Premium fuel, and periodic intake/valve cleaning via spray should help delay the valve carbon issues.

Who knows... maybe EGR cleaning is going to be a "thing".

Spent 1/2 my day removing, cleaning and reinstalling the EGR, which was pretty coked-up. The cleaning went well, but no dice, it's still burning out the F3 fuse and then overheating.
If the carbon was heavy, I wouldn't be surprised if the electrical portion is damaged. There doesn't need to be a short for a fuse to blow. Just excessive current load.
  • If the valve portion has carbon buildup it would draw extra current.
  • If the electronics portion were damaged due to excess load from carbon buildup.
  • If the electronics portion were damaged due to heat.
Engine bay mounted Dodge power control modules die constantly because of heat. 6.5 diesel PMDs, etc. $800 to get your horn working sound fun ? ugh.



The direct injected engines run really rich when they are cold. If all you do is run it for a mile or two before shutting it off, I can see the carbon building up very quickly.
Yup. All direct injection motors already have bad carbon issues.
As you say, short ICE running durations, especially in winter, makes it even worse for the valves and the EGR.


With DI engines periodic use of Seafoam (or other such) motor treatment is a necessary maintenance task, I believe. Otherwise the buildup of crud around the valves will make the engine stumble eventually.
Yes.

There is a company that has proven test results from their intake and valvetrain cleaner when used for direct injection motors. I can't recall the name. It's definitely not Seafoam.

Exactly the same issue for me a few weeks ago and when reading all the EGR failures they seem to have a common problem, an internal short causing F3 to blow, and thereby causing all the other systems on the same fuse to stop working.
There doesn't need to be a short for a fuse to blow. Just excessive current load.

I would love to get my hands on a failed EGR unit and see what is what. Aftermarket manufacturers would likely love to sell an "improved" version.
At the very least we can send it to BigClive's youtube channel and he can "take it to bits"

This winter, when I get room in the shop, I may just check our EGR for buildup, and to see what possible other issues could be there.


Count yourself lucky... if the EGR is the biggest problem with the 1.5 Voltec, it isn't bad.

Ford, GM, Chrysler, Subaru, VW, and BMW (valvetrain failure leading to ECM failure for example), Audi (Oil ring failure requiring piston replacement at 43 hrs labour) etc etc etc all have issues.
When customers ask what they should buy... I usually tell them.. "an old car in nice shape"
It's really a vehicle and drivetrain specific choice, not a manufacturer one

I wonder who makes the EGR valve ? Maybe the circuit board has some stamping.
 
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Does anyone know if the ERG valve is a third-party unit? In searching for the 4024770 code, it seems the BMW also may use this part, judging from the picture of the part in it’s bulletin.
4024770 is simply the warranty labour code for "Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve Replacement". It applies to other motors including Duramax diesels, even though they don't share the same part.

Most OEM parts are made under contract by OEM suppliers, not by the actual vehicle manufacturer themselves. Like many other parts, eventually it may be sold as new or reman by aftermarket manufacturers.
 

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Yes, I realize that 4024770 is the labor code. In searching that number, BMW also was listed with a small picture of the valve. In thinking it over, I am realizing that each valve most likely has to be unique to the associated engine due to packaging constraints under the hood.
I wonder how detailed the requirements are that are given by GM Engineering to the OEM. Does GM do the detailed engineering or does the OEM? Or is the design a collaboration between the two companies?
 
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I am realizing that each valve most likely has to be unique to the associated engine due to packaging constraints under the hood.
I wonder how detailed the requirements are that are given by GM Engineering to the OEM. Does GM do the detailed engineering or does the OEM? Or is the design a collaboration between the two companies?
Not sure about design collaboration. I do know someone i could ask.

Packaging + electronics + exhaust flow would all be engine platform specific.

In the old days when an EGR valve was controlled by vaccuum or simple 2 wire solenoid, a single valve could fit more engines.

I am assuming that the Ecotec/Voltec valve uses more complicated, and likely platform specific, electronics, like many new cars do, but I have yet to take one apart.

I also wonder if an EGR delete is possible.
 
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I wonder how detailed the requirements are that are given by GM Engineering to the OEM. Does GM do the detailed engineering or does the OEM? Or is the design a collaboration between the two companies?
That would be highly depended on the specific component in question... Something like an AC compressor (belt driven) would be mostly 'off the shelf' but there would be options, etc. that would be custom for each customer - pressure/suction manifold, sensors, pulley type/size/offset, etc. Something like a mechanical water pump would be much more custom and collaborative. For an EGR valve, I would bet that the internal components are already designed, but the housing is completely custom for the customer/application.

-Charlie
 

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I posted about this in the FB group, but I'll share it here too...

I decided I would try out unplugging the EGR just in case I ever need to if I'm stranded somewhere, and that bugger is very difficult to remove. No matter how hard I squeezed the tab, I could not get the connector off. I finally decided to try to squeeze it with some pliers, and the tab broke. So, mine has no tab anymore, but it still seems pretty snug when plugged in.

So, just be prepared.
 

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Update: Local Chevy dealer (Austin AutoNation) is going to cover the EGR replacement under warrantee (2017 w/~48,000mi). We bought the car there new. Faith temporarily restored (GM/dealer standing behind product). However, it will be a while as the EGR is on backorder, again. We have the car back home and it will be driven on electric only until it's fixed.

Also, I did remove the metal clips and took off the black cover WITH THE EGR INSTALLED. That was a mistake. Kinda mangled some solder points. From what I could see it was clean and mechanically sound. Gears looked good. There was a small circuit board integrated into the black cover and it looked pretty normal on the back side that I could see. No burn marks or evidence of distress. If anyone tries to do this, I highly recommend removing the EGR so you can be more surgical about it. I had just gotten done cleaning and reinstalling and re-burning the F3 fuse (lol), so I didn't want to take it off again.
 

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Thanks for the update.
 

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Car is repaired and dealer covered cost (EGR + labor). Runs great.

Service center folk recommend Induction Service, where I guess they feed a cleaner into the intake, car smokes a bunch, and then it's "clean". I see no reason why this can't be done at home. Anyone have any ideas what their cocktail is, and the method? Or just Seafoam fuel treatment instead?

Thanks,
John
 

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Car is repaired and dealer covered cost (EGR + labor). Runs great.

Service center folk recommend Induction Service, where I guess they feed a cleaner into the intake, car smokes a bunch, and then it's "clean". I see no reason why this can't be done at home. Anyone have any ideas what their cocktail is, and the method? Or just Seafoam fuel treatment instead?

Thanks,
John
Glad you are whole again! As far as the induction treatment goes, I would google search for the proper way (and product) to perform this task, which, I think, would be relatively simple. The problem is the carbon coke on the stems and backs of the intake valves. Something that rapidly removes the baked on gunk while not damaging the catalytic converter is required.

I've witnessed someone performing the task way back in 1956. It produced a large cloud of white exhaust as the liquid was poured into the carburetor with the engine at high rev. You would have to have the means of revving the engine while stationary, probably with commands through the OBDII port. It's something that I don't know how to do.
If it were me, I'd have the dealer do the deed.
 

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Service center folk recommend Induction Service...
Hooray for the repair!

Question: Are they recommending this "Induction Service" because the ICE operates so infrequently or at such low RPM? I'm curious about the cause of the build-up. Didi they tell you anything about what caused it to be needed?
 
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