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Hello all. Just purchased this CPO vehicle through Carvana. It has 29,300 miles. I've been charging it at 8 amps at work on an EVSE charger. It will fully charge in 4-5 hours and the light is solid green. It will absolutely not charge to the 53 Mi EV battery capacity thus far. It was a bit warmer today while at work so I figured it would charge beyond where it's been capping out at during these colder weather temps... which is 45 mi. It was around 65 degrees and sunny today. So I figured maybe it would venture beyond that 45 Mi threshold. It didn't. I assume that the previous owner (only 1 previous owner) maybe overcharged it and possibly left it charging in warm to hot weather all too often. It's around 8 percent degradation at this stage.

Should I wait until it's 70-85 degrees out to fully test this true EV battery threshold and see if it goes beyond 45 Mi? Or bring it to a mechanic to test its true degradation? It's under warranty still, plus extended warranty.

Thanks!
 

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Hello all. Just purchased this CPO vehicle through Carvana. It has 29,300 miles. I've been charging it at 8 amps at work on an EVSE charger. It will fully charge in 4-5 hours and the light is solid green. It will absolutely not charge to the 53 Mi EV battery capacity thus far. It was a bit warmer today while at work so I figured it would charge beyond where it's been capping out at during these colder weather temps... which is 45 mi. It was around 65 degrees and sunny today. So I figured maybe it would venture beyond that 45 Mi threshold. It didn't. I assume that the previous owner (only 1 previous owner) maybe overcharged it and possibly left it charging in warm to hot weather all too often. It's around 8 percent degradation at this stage.

Should I wait until it's 70-85 degrees out to fully test this true EV battery threshold and see if it goes beyond 45 Mi? Or bring it to a mechanic to test its true degradation? It's under warranty still, plus extended warranty.

Thanks!
The Volt will adjust based on driving style and use of climate settings and weather. You can train the Volt over time to adjust the estimated range higher and higher. Also use of Preconditioning using the app or even your key fob will also help in hot or cold weather.

If you want to see your mileage soar, turn off Eco and Max and set the fan speed to low. This basically just runs the fan, but with no AC or heater. Use of radio and usb charging doesn't have much of an effect on range so don't worry.

But weather and temps will have an affect too. So just continue to drive your car and the Volt will adjust itself to you. Right now it's used to it's previous owners and likely test drives.

Give it a few days like 4 or 5 days and you will see it get better. Degradation in Volt batteries is extremely minimal. The Volt will charge to 100% whether on 110 or 240. But it will 'balance' the batteries of 110v and 12 amps.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

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The 53 miles is an approximation depending on a lot of factors. Condition of the battery should be tested by Kw used from full until the gas motor turns on which you can get from the energy screen and matching that to the usable battery size of your year. Chevy advises to keep it plugged in at all times when parked but this is only necessary in really cold temps (for preconditioning/warming and hot temps for cooling the battery. Battery warranty is for when it drops below 40% on Gen I and 30% on Gen II or if you are getting codes indicating bad cells or some other problems with it...
 

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The window sticker rating for a 2017 Volt is 53 ev miles per charge, but as with all "mileage" ratings, yours may not match the sticker rating... a full charge is a fairly consistent quantity of fuel, not of distance.

Keep in mind this is a previously owned car and the range estimate is likely still being influenced by the previous driver’s driving habits... the car’s computer gathers data as it is being driven, and uses it (weighted for the most recent travel) to create a full charge, start of day estimate on how far the driver can drive the car that day if they drive normally.

It will take some time for the computer to gather your data and adjust the range estimates to reflect your driving habits. It’s also true that electric car range varies with the seasons, down in cold weather, up in warm weather.

If you’ve been able to fully charge in 4-5 hours at 8 amps, that suggests you haven’t really taken a drive far enough to fully deplete the battery. Why not try to do that soon? The energy usage display on the center console will show you the Electric Miles/km driven and kWh Used since the last full charge. Such a drive will give you a better idea of how far you can expect to drive on the quantity of electricity in a full charge.
 

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When I recently bought my 2017 Volt with ~23K miles (and the battery got full diagnostics and is in great shape, with every cell showing 4.05 or 4.06v), the dealer reset the GOM. It showed 52 miles range at almost full charge, I assume it would have shown 53 at full charge. I drive my car pretty aggressively and mostly for short stints on the highway, and not in the slow lane. My estimated range at full charge has been slowly declining--unsurprisingly--and now stands at 39 miles. If I didn't understand how the GOM worked, I'd be freaked out about there being something wrong with my battery.
 

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Don't worry about charging it in extreme weather. The car has heating/cooling for the battery. As others have said, the car is "guessing" how far it will go based on how it has been driven. If you turn off climate control (Eco/Max) and keep your speed under 50 mph, you will almost certainly meet or exceed the 53 mile range (depending on tires, PSI).

I live in Saskatchewan, Canada and drive a 2016 Volt and 2017 Volt. I take the '16 on the highway to work, my wife drives the '17 in town only so it shows a higher range. In reality, they both have 14 kWh of useable energy and will go the same distance under the same conditions. I'm just glad winter is mostly over because the '16 was guessing as low as 24 miles in the cold.
 

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Tires matter too. Your mileage is right about when a seller (original owner or Carvana) would decide to replace them to impress a buyer. They are interested in price, not mileage, performance or the long term. I never liked the Michelin Energy Savers that came with my 2017, and I replaced them (at 39K) with Continental Pure Contacts. I don't regret it, I think the car feels more "planted" in all conditions ... but I estimate it cost me 5% range. If range it what matters to you, I suspect getting the Michelin's will be as good as it can get.
 

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Tires matter too. Your mileage is right about when a seller (original owner or Carvana) would decide to replace them to impress a buyer. They are interested in price, not mileage, performance or the long term. I never liked the Michelin Energy Savers that came with my 2017, and I replaced them (at 39K) with Continental Pure Contacts. I don't regret it, I think the car feels more "planted" in all conditions ... but I estimate it cost me 5% range. If range it what matters to you, I suspect getting the Michelin's will be as good as it can get.
I test drove a Volt with Michelin Energy Savers that still had lots of tread on them (not sure of the manufacture date, though). They had shockingly little grip; even taking a corner normally, the back tires would cut loose slightly. I actually wonder whether these particular tires were just old or somehow deteriorated, because I've never experienced that before, including with many other Volts I test drove, and I'm guessing some of the others had the same tires, since I believe they were OEM.
 

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I test drove a Volt with Michelin Energy Savers that still had lots of tread on them (not sure of the manufacture date, though). They had shockingly little grip; even taking a corner normally, the back tires would cut loose slightly. I actually wonder whether these particular tires were just old or somehow deteriorated, because I've never experienced that before, including with many other Volts I test drove, and I'm guessing some of the others had the same tires.
Michelin Energy Savers (Green X) that were original were only designed for fuel economy. It's not sporty by any means. It's horrible in every condition. I had a set that were between 3/32" and 5/32" and they were horrible on a dry pavement at 60F. They were even worse at 30F. I switched them out with Pirelli Cinturato Strada GT2 with hard sidewall-rim saver. So far they're fantastic. I am losing about 1 MPG per 50 miles but I'm willing to give that up for the performance.
 

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I test drove a Volt with Michelin Energy Savers that still had lots of tread on them (not sure of the manufacture date, though). They had shockingly little grip; even taking a corner normally, the back tires would cut loose slightly. I actually wonder whether these particular tires were just old or somehow deteriorated, because I've never experienced that before, including with many other Volts I test drove, and I'm guessing some of the others had the same tires, since I believe they were OEM.
Easing up on performance driving plus moderate weather conditions should significantly improve your GOM indicated available miles.Living on the Big Island (HI) with usual max.50mph where I drive,a full battery indicates up to 85 miles.
(2017 Volt LT currently about 53K miles driven).
 

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Easing up on performance driving plus moderate weather conditions should significantly improve your GOM indicated available miles.Living on the Big Island (HI) with usual max.50mph where I drive,a full battery indicates up to 85 miles.
(2017 Volt LT currently about 53K miles driven).
And eating almost no salt or refined sugars would presumably add years to my life, too, but what's the fun in that? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all for your well thought out responses! Sorry for my delay in response. I'll continue to monitor my battery. So far, in this type of weather, the highest charge I've gotten is 46 mi. I'll see how it changes as the Summer approaches.
 

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Thank you all for your well thought out responses! Sorry for my delay in response. I'll continue to monitor my battery. So far, in this type of weather, the highest charge I've gotten is 46 mi. I'll see how it changes as the Summer approaches.
It seems to me you continue to view your 2017 Volt battery as a fuel tank that is supposed to hold 53 miles worth of driving distance when fully charged, and now it’s up to 46, so maybe when the weather gets warmer... (warmer weather allows the battery to hold more electricity?)...

If a full charge is a fixed amount of fuel, shouldn’t the distance you drive using that fuel depend on how fast you drive? How level or hilly the terrain is? The condition of the tires?

Or perhaps your battery has degraded to 85% of what it was when new, and now a full charge holds only 45 miles of driving distance.
 

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Tires, temperature, terrain, technique and traffic will all have impact on how many miles you get out of a charge, and the number of miles you DO get is what leads to the calculation of range when you start next, looking back in history for probably about 200 miles. (We're not sure how many miles DO influence the range guess, but it's clearly more than just the last charge, yet it does respond pretty well to changes in conditions.)
 

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What's the advantage of replacing your worn OEM Michelin with another set of OEM Energy Saver Michelin? It's horrible at handling, stopping and seems to attract punctures. Is getting 53 miles electric range worth that?
 
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