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Just curious if anyone has used an adapter like this one:


It's kind of obscure because the NEMA 6-15 240 V outlet (shown below) is kind of rare.

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What I'm planning to do is charge two PHEVs using one 50 amp 240 V outlet using this splitter:


I'll use the Volt's OEM EVSE with the 5-15 to 6-15 adapter for one car, and a 240 V EVSE with a 14-50 plug for the other car. The other car is a RAV4 Prime SE (16 amps max charging), and my Volt is a 2016 (also 16 amps max). My understanding is that the Volt's OEM EVSE will only charge at 12 amps, so this set-up should work to charge both cars simultaneously: 12 amps to the OEM EVSE + 16 amps to the aftermarket EVSE = 28 amps, well under the capacity of the 50 amp outlet and circuit breaker. And the Volt's OEM EVSE won't draw more current than the adapter or splitter are rated for (15 amps).

Thoughts? Am I missing anything?
 

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No modifications to the clipper creek 120v charger, (EVSE). I made an adapter that will plug into a 240v outlet and allows the EVSE to plug into it therefore supplying 240v to the 120v EVSE.

Then, if you want to charge during non peak times, it’s a matter of setting up the charge mode characteristics.
I’ve set mine up so it charges at 12A, location based, non peak only with our non peak being idnight to 3 in the afternoon. It’ll do a full charge in about 5.5hrs. It’s fully charged by 6am
so what do i do to my 120 volt to get it to charge in 5 hours. Im all in there!
 

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How? Do i need an electrician?
Read starting from post 1 in the thread and go from there. You need a 240 wall plug and the right connector on your charger, connected in the correct way. If you aren't comfortable with any of those steps, then, yes...

-Charlie
 

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When you are adding or modifying your house electrical system (not replacing like for like), you probably/may need an electrical permit to keep your house insurance valid. This would include an inspection to insure the job is done correctly. I've always done my own electrical work (from adding circuits to adding subpanels). Not sure about getting an electrician to do it, whether they do the paper work behind the scenes. A phone call to your insurance broker and municipality or city engineering department will give you the low down. Wouldn't want a fire then on inspection they find the wiring didn't match what was on record giving the insurance company an out.
 

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Just curious if anyone has used an adapter like this one:


It's kind of obscure because the NEMA 6-15 240 V outlet (shown below) is kind of rare.

View attachment 173311

What I'm planning to do is charge two PHEVs using one 50 amp 240 V outlet using this splitter:


I'll use the Volt's OEM EVSE with the 5-15 to 6-15 adapter for one car, and a 240 V EVSE with a 14-50 plug for the other car. The other car is a RAV4 Prime SE (16 amps max charging), and my Volt is a 2016 (also 16 amps max). My understanding is that the Volt's OEM EVSE will only charge at 12 amps, so this set-up should work to charge both cars simultaneously: 12 amps to the OEM EVSE + 16 amps to the aftermarket EVSE = 28 amps, well under the capacity of the 50 amp outlet and circuit breaker. And the Volt's OEM EVSE won't draw more current than the adapter or splitter are rated for (15 amps).

Thoughts? Am I missing anything?
I use a 6-15 adapter with my Volt EVSE, works fine. Your plan would functionally work; did you already move forward with this?
 

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I use a 6-15 adapter with my Volt EVSE, works fine. Your plan would functionally work; did you already move forward with this?
Yes, it works beautifully. I mounted all the cords and connections, and both EVSE bodies, onto the concrete block wall of my garage, so they are out of the way and secure. I ran the charging cables along the ceiling via hooks and mounted J1772 holsters on the garage ceiling. The ceiling is pretty low so it's easy to mount and dismount the handles. I start charging one car at midnight and the other at 12:15 am and they have both been charging flawlessly for a few weeks.
 

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moved to Accessories & Mods
 

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First off, everyone should send a big thanks to forum user NAMJA for trusting me and sending me his brand new 2016 Volt EVSE so I could open it up, poke around in it, and possibly fry it!

After exhaustive research of the internal components, I came to the conclusion that it will happily and safely handle 240VAC allowing the Volt to charge at L2 speeds. This means ZERO modifications to your EVSE on the inside or out to achieve this. All you need is an adapter to allow the EVSE's 5-15 plug to go from Hot-Neutral-Ground of 120VAC to Hot-Hot-Ground of 200-250VAC, like on a dryer outlet.

Since the EVSE is originally rated for 120VAC on a 15A circuit, it will only advertise 12A down the pilot wire (80% constant load x 15A = 12A). This means you will be doubling your charge rate over the L1 for a maximum of 3kWh. Now, I know the Gen2 can handle 3.6kWh, but the wire gauge wouldn't be safe to much higher amperages and I'm not about to modify the pilot signal to advertise 15A.

More good news, this EVSE is made by Clipper Creek!

EVEN MORE good news for those of you charging at L1 speeds, the NEMA 5-15 plug on this EVSE has a built-in thermal sensor! NO MORE MELTED SOCKETS! At first, I was just going to replace the whole input cord, but that would get rid of that safety feature. Adapting to 5-15 and keeping that thermal sensor is best.

After wiring up an adapter for this EVSE, I plugged it into a 240V outlet and charged my Tesla at 12A for 30 mins or so. Nothing got hot, at all. Clipper Creek does a great job on their EVSEs and it's good to see they've stuck to the larger gauge wire as compared to the thinner/hotter Lear configuration on the 2010, 11, 12, and 15.

Here are the pictures of the EVSE's guts along with some action shots of it charging on 240VAC in my Tesla.


If anyone would like me to make an adapter for them, let me know.

Make sure your EVSE looks like this!
First off, everyone should send a big thanks to forum user NAMJA for trusting me and sending me his brand new 2016 Volt EVSE so I could open it up, poke around in it, and possibly fry it!

After exhaustive research of the internal components, I came to the conclusion that it will happily and safely handle 240VAC allowing the Volt to charge at L2 speeds. This means ZERO modifications to your EVSE on the inside or out to achieve this. All you need is an adapter to allow the EVSE's 5-15 plug to go from Hot-Neutral-Ground of 120VAC to Hot-Hot-Ground of 200-250VAC, like on a dryer outlet.

Since the EVSE is originally rated for 120VAC on a 15A circuit, it will only advertise 12A down the pilot wire (80% constant load x 15A = 12A). This means you will be doubling your charge rate over the L1 for a maximum of 3kWh. Now, I know the Gen2 can handle 3.6kWh, but the wire gauge wouldn't be safe to much higher amperages and I'm not about to modify the pilot signal to advertise 15A.

More good news, this EVSE is made by Clipper Creek!

EVEN MORE good news for those of you charging at L1 speeds, the NEMA 5-15 plug on this EVSE has a built-in thermal sensor! NO MORE MELTED SOCKETS! At first, I was just going to replace the whole input cord, but that would get rid of that safety feature. Adapting to 5-15 and keeping that thermal sensor is best.

After wiring up an adapter for this EVSE, I plugged it into a 240V outlet and charged my Tesla at 12A for 30 mins or so. Nothing got hot, at all. Clipper Creek does a great job on their EVSEs and it's good to see they've stuck to the larger gauge wire as compared to the thinner/hotter Lear configuration on the 2010, 11, 12, and 15.

Here are the pictures of the EVSE's guts along with some action shots of it charging on 240VAC in my Tesla.


If anyone would like me to make an adapter for them, let me know.

Make sure your EVSE looks like this!
I just tried to make my own adapter to use my 208v 14-50 outlet and it popped the Voltec EVSE. Too bad I liked the solution.
 

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I just tried to make my own adapter to use my 208v 14-50 outlet and it popped the Voltec EVSE. Too bad I liked the solution.
Then you did something wrong or were trying it on an older EVSE (pre Volt Gen 2) that doesn't support the 240V input.
 

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First off, everyone should send a big thanks to forum user NAMJA for trusting me and sending me his brand new 2016 Volt EVSE so I could open it up, poke around in it, and possibly fry it!

After exhaustive research of the internal components, I came to the conclusion that it will happily and safely handle 240VAC allowing the Volt to charge at L2 speeds. This means ZERO modifications to your EVSE on the inside or out to achieve this. All you need is an adapter to allow the EVSE's 5-15 plug to go from Hot-Neutral-Ground of 120VAC to Hot-Hot-Ground of 200-250VAC, like on a dryer outlet.

Since the EVSE is originally rated for 120VAC on a 15A circuit, it will only advertise 12A down the pilot wire (80% constant load x 15A = 12A). This means you will be doubling your charge rate over the L1 for a maximum of 3kWh. Now, I know the Gen2 can handle 3.6kWh, but the wire gauge wouldn't be safe to much higher amperages and I'm not about to modify the pilot signal to advertise 15A.

More good news, this EVSE is made by Clipper Creek!

EVEN MORE good news for those of you charging at L1 speeds, the NEMA 5-15 plug on this EVSE has a built-in thermal sensor! NO MORE MELTED SOCKETS! At first, I was just going to replace the whole input cord, but that would get rid of that safety feature. Adapting to 5-15 and keeping that thermal sensor is best.

After wiring up an adapter for this EVSE, I plugged it into a 240V outlet and charged my Tesla at 12A for 30 mins or so. Nothing got hot, at all. Clipper Creek does a great job on their EVSEs and it's good to see they've stuck to the larger gauge wire as compared to the thinner/hotter Lear configuration on the 2010, 11, 12, and 15.

Here are the pictures of the EVSE's guts along with some action shots of it charging on 240VAC in my Tesla.


If anyone would like me to make an adapter for them, let me know.

Make sure your EVSE looks like this!
I would like you to make me an adapter, I have a 2017 volt stock charger.
 

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I would like you to make me an adapter, I have a 2017 volt stock charger.
The adapter would have a standard 5-15 receptacle on one end just like a normal extension cord:
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and a 240V plug on the other. But which one?

Depends what kind of 240V outlet you are plugging into: a clothes dryer? RV Trailer? Electric welder?


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My 240V EVSE plugs into a NEMA 6-50 outlet for example, my old clothes dryer uses a NEMA 10-30. Newer dryer use NEMA 14-30.

If you have ever replaced the end of an extension cord, you can make an adapter using a foot long black rubber coated cable (Home Depot, Lowes will cut to length) that has three, 12 gauge wires (White, Black, Green (ground)). Add the NEMA 5-15 recepticle on one end and whatever 240V plug is needed on the other. In the pictures above, the black wire goes to a black pin, the white wire goes to the other black pin, and the ground wire goes to the green pin.

Wire stripper and screwdriver are needed.
 

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Yes, I don't get excited over this too much. If I have a 240V outlet at home, I have a 240v EVSE, no need for the adapter for my portable EVSE. Otherwise, the 240V adapter approach for the 120V EVSE almost requires a duffel bag of adapters if the plan is to plug in to whatever 240V outlet you may stumble upon in the wild.
 
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