GM Volt Forum banner

21 - 31 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,941 Posts
Yes, change the battery, the old one is toast. My 12v battery lasted 7 years, and I changed it before it could potentially leave me stranded. But the volt does all sorts of whirring and clicking when you leave it alone, so having it plugged in might have helped you from losing your 12v battery so soon. Then again, getting a new battery every 4 years isn’t all that bad. All cars need regular maintenance.

My 2017 Volt (42 month old) just went dead. I was able to recharge it via the charge terminals under the hood and jumper cables. I read in one of the forums that once these batteries die, they are unreliable and it is best to replace them. I keep it parked in a warm garage with daytime temps around 95F. I only have 10k miles on it because it has been parked at my vacation home. I have been going there 4-5 times per year for 7-10 days at a time. The car has been parked usually without EVSE charger attached for up to 3-4 months at a time.
Questions:
1. Should I leave it plugged into my EVSE, when I leave for up to 4 months? It is connected to a Juicebox EVSE that can be scheduled to limit charging to a specified time period during the day. Alternately, I could use the controls in the Volt to limit charging.
2. If the transportation mode was suitable it would probably be too complicated for my property manager or wife to turn off. I am not keen of disconnecting the - terminal of the battery in the trunk for the same reason. My property manager occasionally needs to drive it while I am gone so my solution needs to be as simple as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,797 Posts
Simplest solution may be to get them to use it/turn it on for a while every couple of weeks so the High Voltage battery can charge up the 12V battery. Plugging it in to an EVSE doesn't charge the 12V after a short time. The 12V is constantly being used (drained) while the car is off unless you put it in transport mode. While not really complicated, for some one not used to the car or who seldom uses it, the simplest way is to turn it on for a bit. I say two weeks but it should be good for up to a month. It should always be plugged in if temps are in the high range (90F is quoted).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,569 Posts
I always recommend keeping the Volt plugged in so the battery management system can heat or cool the battery as necessary. And for longer than 3 weeks, I recommend keeping a trickle charger or battery tender connected to the 12v battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
The 12v battery seems to be a very critical make up of the entire propulsion and electronic system. That being said, is it wise just to replace this battery at a certain age or mileage or is it safe enough to wait and see. With an ICE vehicle, you have time and plenty of tell tale signs. Can the same be said for an electric vehicle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,197 Posts
The 12v battery seems to be a very critical make up of the entire propulsion and electronic system. That being said, is it wise just to replace this battery at a certain age or mileage or is it safe enough to wait and see. With an ICE vehicle, you have time and plenty of tell tale signs. Can the same be said for an electric vehicle?
Nope, there's no reliable indicator of when the battery has aged and sagged past reliability for Volts. And the only LIKELY good test would work is "Let car sit for two hours, measure voltage at battery terminals, applied a 50 amp load for some amount of time, measure voltage at battery terminals, make sure the two voltages aren't too low." But we don't even know what the right amount of time is, though it's probably less than a minute, or what the voltage that's "too low" is, though "above nominal 12v" might be a good starting point.
 

·
Registered
16,17 volt
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
one of the things that may have an effect on the life of your 12v battery is simply driving at night
the car ups the 12 volt system to13.2 volts, it does this , i assume, is to get the lumens out of the head lites
this also I believe puts the 12 volt battery in a over charge condition while doing this
so only drive your volt during daylight hours :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
Nope, there's no reliable indicator of when the battery has aged and sagged past reliability for Volts. And the only LIKELY good test would work is "Let car sit for two hours, measure voltage at battery terminals, applied a 50 amp load for some amount of time, measure voltage at battery terminals, make sure the two voltages aren't too low." But we don't even know what the right amount of time is, though it's probably less than a minute, or what the voltage that's "too low" is, though "above nominal 12v" might be a good starting point.
Besides getting a message "reduced propulsion power" and your car stops running? 😁
 

·
Registered
2017 Volt Premier 80k+ Miles
Joined
·
593 Posts
My game plan is to replace the 12V at the 5 year mark, at the same time as I'm doing all the other 5 year maintenance items. I believe this is a reasonable replacement point, and it should provide a conservative degree of protection of it failing unexpectedly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: microVOLT

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,197 Posts
Besides getting a message "reduced propulsion power" and your car stops running? 😁
GENERALLY that's a sign of a bigger problem than a 12v being old. The hallmarks of old-12v messages are that they're spurious, and therefore they tend toward nonsensical. Like it telling you to service the parking assist when your car doesn't HAVE parking assist or a window-washer fluid low message and it's fine, or the audio cue whooosh playing after you've pulled away and driven half a mile toward the grocery store. and generally the don't repeat or even happen most times when you start the car. They may even never repeat again.
 

·
Registered
16,17 volt
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
you people made me look up something
Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) Battery Information - Battery University
As with all gelled and sealed units, AGM batteries are sensitive to overcharging. A charge to 2.40V/cell (and higher) is fine; however, the float charge should be reduced to between 2.25 and 2.30V/cell (summer temperatures may require lower voltages). Automotive charging systems for flooded lead acid often have a fixed float voltage setting of 14.40V (2.40V/cell); a direct replacement with a sealed unit could overcharge the battery on a long drive.

so, here is my question
why am i seeing 12.2v to 15.2 on my dash cam that has a voltage reading on the screen running down the road in ev mode just above freezing, 115 km/hr
according to this float is 13.5 to13.8
15.2 is no good for the battery and 12.2 is no good for the car

let me guess
original programing was for a normal battery and along the way they changed to a glass mat battery and didnt catch all the programing for the normal battery to change it
 
21 - 31 of 31 Posts
Top