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I was worried about my 2016 original battery life and recently two events were of concern. First, the "no remote detected" message when seated, but detection occurred normally when the remote was held over the center console. The remote battery read 2.98v. Not good enough and a new remote battery fixed the problem. Second, the initialization process when starting was taking about double the usual 3-5 seconds. The 12 v battery read 12.33, which, according to a previous post here, indicates a 50% state of charge. Uh, oh. I connected my smart Battery Tender overnight which fixed both the low voltage reading and the slow initialization time- with no recurrence. So, be aware: cold weather brings out battery problems. p.s. -- my Harbor Freight multi meter has proved to be adequate for voltage checks.
 

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Check that the 12V battery terminal connections are still clean and tight.
 

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My '17 Volt was delivered to me in mid March of 2016. Last May, I returned home to WI from a winter in the southern states to find my Volt blacked-out dead. I had left it in our attached garage plugged in to the EVSE. Eventually, I figured out that the (original) 12V battery had gone dead. When I measured the voltage, it was just below 2V. Everyone on this forum insisted that I had to go buy a new battery...the original was now "toast". I was prepared to do so, too...but I figured if I was going to toss it anyway, I had nothing to lose buy trying to resurrect it. I have a 25A heavy-duty Schumacher charger that I put on it on the 25A setting. The charger sat with the needle pegged on 25 for a few hours before it gradually started to come down. After several hours, it had fallen to 10A, so I switched the charger to its only other setting: 10A. It was many hours later before it had fallen to around 5A, at which point I removed the Schumacher and replaced it with a CTEK MUS 4.3 that I have, and left it overnight. Some time the following afternoon, the CTEK had reached the 7-out-of-8 L.E.D.s lit stage, which is just short of float voltage. The battery appeared to be fully charged, so I reconnected it to the car. It has been acting perfectly normally ever since.

I felt like such a yutz, just assuming the 12V battery would be maintained along with the HV battery...which, it turns out, is not true. After everything that happened, I had begun planning a charger pigtail installation on the 12V battery when someone here pointed out that they simply attached their 12V charger to the jump points under the hood. DUH! on me, for sure. I have since tried that and it works perfectly.

My point? This was a slightly more than four-year-old AGM battery, that was slammed to zero charge, where it remained for who knows how long in my attached-but-unheated WI garage throughout last winter, that was mostly force-charged with a brute force Schumacher...and it seems to be none the worse for it! Now, maybe it will soon die all of a sudden, but whenever I check the voltage, it looks like a new or nearly new battery. So, if your battery took a full charge...it's probably just fine.
 

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I replaced my 2011 battery at 9 years. It was still working fine, but I felt it was only a matter of time before it started acting up.
 

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My '17 Volt was delivered to me in mid March of 2016. Last May, I returned home to WI from a winter in the southern states to find my Volt blacked-out dead. I had left it in our attached garage plugged in to the EVSE. Eventually, I figured out that the (original) 12V battery had gone dead. When I measured the voltage, it was just below 2V. Everyone on this forum insisted that I had to go buy a new battery...the original was now "toast". I was prepared to do so, too...but I figured if I was going to toss it anyway, I had nothing to lose buy trying to resurrect it. I have a 25A heavy-duty Schumacher charger that I put on it on the 25A setting. The charger sat with the needle pegged on 25 for a few hours before it gradually started to come down. After several hours, it had fallen to 10A, so I switched the charger to its only other setting: 10A. It was many hours later before it had fallen to around 5A, at which point I removed the Schumacher and replaced it with a CTEK MUS 4.3 that I have, and left it overnight. Some time the following afternoon, the CTEK had reached the 7-out-of-8 L.E.D.s lit stage, which is just short of float voltage. The battery appeared to be fully charged, so I reconnected it to the car. It has been acting perfectly normally ever since.

I felt like such a yutz, just assuming the 12V battery would be maintained along with the HV battery...which, it turns out, is not true. After everything that happened, I had begun planning a charger pigtail installation on the 12V battery when someone here pointed out that they simply attached their 12V charger to the jump points under the hood. DUH! on me, for sure. I have since tried that and it works perfectly.

My point? This was a slightly more than four-year-old AGM battery, that was slammed to zero charge, where it remained for who knows how long in my attached-but-unheated WI garage throughout last winter, that was mostly force-charged with a brute force Schumacher...and it seems to be none the worse for it! Now, maybe it will soon die all of a sudden, but whenever I check the voltage, it looks like a new or nearly new battery. So, if your battery took a full charge...it's probably just fine.
For future reference, if you are leaving the Volt parked for more than 4 weeks you should leave the Volt's traction battery pack at 30% state of charge, not at100% state of charge and do not leave the Volt plugged in. To keep the 12V battery from discharging you should either connect a battery minder (one designed for maintaining AGM batteries) directly to the 12V battery or disconnect the negative lead from the 12V battery. As for your winter 2019 experience with the Volt having a dead 12V battery when you returned in May even though the Volt was plugged in are you certain that the circuit breaker did not trip? The 2017 Volt will periodically charge the 12V battery if the Volt is plugged in.
 

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For future reference, if you are leaving the Volt parked for more than 4 weeks you should leave the Volt's traction battery pack at 30% state of charge, not at100% state of charge and do not leave the Volt plugged in. To keep the 12V battery from discharging you should either connect a battery minder (one designed for maintaining AGM batteries) directly to the 12V battery or disconnect the negative lead from the 12V battery. As for your winter 2019 experience with the Volt having a dead 12V battery when you returned in May even though the Volt was plugged in are you certain that the circuit breaker did not trip? The 2017 Volt will periodically charge the 12V battery if the Volt is plugged in.
When I returned and found the car dead, the 240V feed to the EVSE was still live (the power circuit L.E.D. was lit), but the car was completely dark. Before connecting that big Schmacher charger to the 12V, I tried the CTEK briefly before I actually measured the battery's voltage and realized how hopeless that was. However, as soon as the CTEK was connected and providing a 12V source for the car, everything woke up. The dash display came on normally and reported that the HV battery was still fully charged. Then I disconnected the CTEK and it went dark again. I'm assuming that the car was fine during storage until the 12V battery's voltage gradually dropped below whatever the system's voltage threshold is and then the car just "signed off" and went to sleep, with the 12V battery continuing to discharge from whatever minor load(s) is(are) on it when the car is off. Though I have seen others here also insist that the car charges the 12V battery from time to time when it's plugged in to the EVSE, my experience strongly suggests otherwise. How many other owners have plugged their cars in and then walked away for several winter months to find out?

And yes, I saw those HV battery storage recommendations in the manual when I finally looked at it...after my experience (DUH! on me, again). However, I strongly question the wisdom of leaving the car unplugged in an unheated garage in Wisconsin for the duration of a winter. The temperature in that garage often hovers well below freezing temperature for many weeks at a time. The HV battery has all manor of temperature-related safeguards built into the car in an attempt to keep the battery within a "comfortable" (for the battery) temperature range. When it's plugged into the EVSE in the garage during the summer, and the garage is holding steady temps well into the 90s, the car regularly runs a cooling circuit/fan to keep the battery cool, and the same thing happens (for heating) when it's cold in the winter. Now, I realize those functions probably only occur when the car is plugged in to the EVSE, but still...the HV battery's longevity is obviously better served when the battery's temperature is kept within that "Goldylocks" temperature window. Having the battery sit, in any state of charge, for months at a time when the battery is much too cold simply cannot be good for it. It would be nice if it was possible to plug the car into the EVSE and then tell it not to charge. That way, you could leave it at 30% or whatever SOC and still have the EVSE powering the battery heating/cooling functions. Is that possible? I skipped the parts of the manual that explained how to program the charging functions because I've always wanted the car to charge immediately upon plugging it in...
 

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The Gen1 Volt would only charge the 12V battery while plugged in while the traction battery pack was charging. This was later changed so that the Volt will periodically charge the 12V battery as long as the Volt is plugged in. If your 2017 Volt is not maintaining the 12V while the Volt is plugged in there may be an issue with your Volt's on-board charging circuitry. There is a separate circuit dedicated to charging the 12V battery that may have failed.

While the Volt is plugged in the Volt's battery temperature management system will maintain the temperature of the battery pack in both hot and cold temperatures.

The published information regarding the affect of hot and cold temperatures on lithium ion batteries does not align with your assumption regarding cold temperatures harming the Volt's battery. Warm temperatures, over time, will degrade the performance of a lithium ion battery however while charging the Volt's battery temperature management system will allow the lithium ion battery pack to become warm for optimal charging efficiency. The Volt will automatically cool down the battery pack once charging has been completed.

Cold temperatures will affect the available power of the battery pack. At extreme cold temperatures there may not be enough power available to drive the Volt until the battery has been warmed. At temperatures below 0C/32F regenerative braking is disabled, charging is unavailable to avoid damaging the battery. The battery can sit, indefinitely, at cold temperatures without charging as long as the battery is warmed prior to charging. GM limits the available capacity of the Gen2 battery pack to ~14kWh out of 18.4kWh so the Volt's battery is never charged to 100%. Still, GM recommends that for long term storage you do not leave the Volt fully charged or plugged in and that is why 30% state of charge for long term storage is preferred.

The only way, as far as I am aware, to leave the Volt plugged in for extended period but not charge the battery would be to create a delayed charging schedule, enter peak, mid-peak and off peak charging rates and create a limited charging window for each day of the week that would limit the Volt's window to charge for no more than a few minutes per day. This would limit but not eliminate charging the battery. If you had a smart EVSE you might be able to periodically remotely toggle the EVSE on and off. This would allow the 12V battery to be maintained charged as needed. The Volt would only start charging if the EVSE was turned on during the defined off-peak rate period established in the charging schedule.

Other manufacturers have different charging options. Tesla, for example, enables charging to 100% but recommends that their vehicles only be charged up to 90% on a regular basis, the vehicle can be charged to 100% prior to leaving an an extended road trip with no issue. Tesla recommends always leaving the Tesla vehicle plugged in. Since you can set the charge limit to anywhere between 50% and 100% this is not an issue if the vehicle will be parked for an extended period.
 

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~ 8 Years from cars manufacture. Included a number of weeks each year parked in "Transport mode" and others where it wasn't charged or driven and that would have shortened it's life a bit.
Covid Lock down finally finished it off.
Still don't drive much so have fitted cables in engine bay battery terminal to a plug near the wiper plug into a Projecta 12V 1.5Amp 4 stage smart trickle charger / battery tender.
Save me distroying the new battery due to lack of driving.
Travel more on the push bike these days then the x2 cars combined! Been a totally strange year 2020 in so many ways.
 

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a smart tender at the correct MODE should work.
not sure what Voltage a smart trickle uses ?

I have only tried the time of day charging as posted above then only for a 2 week window.

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Deep Cycle AGM:- AGM batteries should be charged using a charger with a mode switch for AGM type batteries. It is recommended to use a charger, current limited to 20% or 0.2C of the batteries capacity at a charging voltage of between 14.6 – 14.8V following deep cycle use, or 13.6V – 13.8V for standby use.
 

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My 12v battery has been working fine for 7 years, but when I brought my volt in for the battery balancing recall, they checked it and told me it’s time. Just changed it out this afternoon after ordering a new AGM from Advanced Autoparts.
 

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My 12v battery has been working fine for 7 years, but when I brought my volt in for the battery balancing recall, they checked it and told me it’s time. Just changed it out this afternoon after ordering a new AGM from Advanced Autoparts.
how many modules have you replace in those 7 years, just curious
 

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how many modules have you replace in those 7 years, just curious
Modules? Not sure what you mean. The only repairs to this volt to date were a sw update in an attempt to fix bluetooth, some body shop work to resolve a stop sign that appeared from nowhere, more body shop work because of a kamikaze deer, a passenger seat sensor, and having Paula, the lovely service advisor torque my bearing nuts. Plus the usual oil changes, fluid changes, tire replacements. No main battery modules needed to be replaced.
 

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Modules? Not sure what you mean. The only repairs to this volt to date were a sw update in an attempt to fix bluetooth, some body shop work to resolve a stop sign that appeared from nowhere, more body shop work because of a kamikaze deer, a passenger seat sensor, and having Paula, the lovely service advisor torque my bearing nuts. Plus the usual oil changes, fluid changes, tire replacements. No main battery modules needed to be replaced.
have the car do any weird stuff, connect phone , not connect phone, screens go blank for a short time, collision avoidance deactivate, stereo cut out when cranked, key pob work or not work, like my car
 

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have the car do any weird stuff, connect phone , not connect phone, screens go blank for a short time, collision avoidance deactivate, stereo cut out when cranked, key pob work or not work, like my car
Oh. I discovered that the more in a hurry I am to connect my iPhone to Bluetooth, the more it doesn’t work. Basically after I start the car I drive to the end of my 1400 foot driveway before I try syncing my phone to play music over Bluetooth. Works every time. Otherwise I get into a state where the phone says it’s playing, but no audio streams, and phone reseat and radio power ons and offs are hit or miss. Sometimes going around the horn by pressing the source button over and over will cause music to play. But the gen1 volt is light years behind nearly every Bluetooth enabled rental car I’ve driven when I travelled... obviously before covid.

this has nothing to do with the 12v battery, it has everything to do with the crappy infotainment system.
 

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maybe the crappy infotainment system, has everything to do with the 12v
how many hints can i give
 

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One thing I will say that I have learned with AGM batteries over the years is they don't like to stay charging. I built myself a remote control lawn mower that uses an old electric wheelchair and 2 35ah AGM batteries for the drive motors, gas push mower body is the mower still. I have had it in service for about 7 years now and I have learned to leave the batteries unplugged over the winter. I used to hook them to my tender charger for AGM batteries it is a NOCO one and then I would get one more year out of them before the life was too short to mow.

Now I unplug them as usual and store them in the house as I always have but I don't plug them into the charger. I just let them hang out and if I think about it after 3-4 months I will plug it into the tender and let it charge it back up, then unplug it until spring. When I would leave them on the tender all winter they would die that next summer and need to be replaced. Now I have the same batteries for the last 4 years and they still are going strong. The ones that I would leave on the tender all winter stored inside, I went through a bunch of sets of them so not just one bad pair, but they would either have short life or the charger would go to thermal protection when charging. The charger would error out saying the battery was overheating and it was in fact hot. Something would happen to the batteries sitting on the tender all winter I don't know enough about battery chemistry but it could be my tender or the fact it floats the charge. Either way leaving it unplugged and then charging it up before use is my solution.

I don't leave them out in the cold I think if they freeze they go funky but I just let them sit down in the basement where it is like 65 and then put them back in action in the spring. I don't know what the car would do if you had the battery taken out for so long if it would mess up the HV battery?
 

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I don't leave them out in the cold I think if they freeze they go funky but I just let them sit down in the basement where it is like 65 and then put them back in action in the spring. I don't know what the car would do if you had the battery taken out for so long if it would mess up the HV battery?
The good news is that the volt 12v battery gets warmed periodically with cabin heat. But if you take the 12v battery out, you might disable a bunch of internal computers designed to preserve the HV battery. When you plug in your volt to the EVSE overnight all sorts of whirring and clicking happens.
 

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My 2017 Volt (42 month old) just went dead. I was able to recharge it via the charge terminals under the hood and jumper cables. I read in one of the forums that once these batteries die, they are unreliable and it is best to replace them. I keep it parked in a warm garage with daytime temps around 95F. I only have 10k miles on it because it has been parked at my vacation home. I have been going there 4-5 times per year for 7-10 days at a time. The car has been parked usually without EVSE charger attached for up to 3-4 months at a time.
Questions:
1. Should I leave it plugged into my EVSE, when I leave for up to 4 months? It is connected to a Juicebox EVSE that can be scheduled to limit charging to a specified time period during the day. Alternately, I could use the controls in the Volt to limit charging.
2. If the transportation mode was suitable it would probably be too complicated for my property manager or wife to turn off. I am not keen of disconnecting the - terminal of the battery in the trunk for the same reason. My property manager occasionally needs to drive it while I am gone so my solution needs to be as simple as possible.
 
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