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2015 VOLT :: Multiple "Glitches" :: GM Buy Back (buyback) Anyone Have Experience ??

Good Morning, Volt Owners, Enthusiasts and Possibly GM!

I am seeking guidance and community feedback about a situation that I find myself in with my 2015 Volt.

The Problem, In Short Form
  • Fall, 2014: Leased a new Chevy Volt from my local dealer.
  • November-ish, 2014: Following a normal stop at an intersection, unbeknownst to me, my Volt called OnStar reporting I was in a serious accident and fled the scene -- police are dispatched to my location, who laughed -- I did not.
  • Late Fall, 2014: Recall for the gas struts on rear hatch.
  • Spring, 2015: Front tire sensors cause brake lockup, front tires are ruined (I'm forced to replace out of pocket), system won't charge, etc.
  • Summer, 2015: Car will not start leaving me stranded -- had to have car towed to dealer for repair.
  • Fall/Winter, 2015: Car still sits with dealer (lots of finger pointing).
The Problem In Long Form
During the fall of 2014, I leased a 2015 Chevrolet Volt from my local dealer. Everything was fine for a month, maybe two.

First Incident -- The Case of the OnStar Nanny State
The first problem that I experienced was a "glitch" related to crash sensors and computer software programming (I was told). In this event I was driving along, stopped for a red light, proceeded after the green and continued to my destination. About 30 mins. later, the local police department arrived at the restaurant I was at looking for the owner of a Chevy Volt. After speaking with the officer, he stated that OnStar had called their central dispatch as I had been in a "serious accident and fled the scene." We went out to the parking lot, reviewed the vehicle for damage and he was re-assured that there was no foul-play; even laughing a little about the situation. I was, however, less than amused.

I was shocked that OnStar had registered a problem, I had no indication of it in the vehicle and that no adviser attempted to contact me in the vehicle or on my mobile phone.

I contacted OnStar and spoke with several levels of management, who basically couldn't explain why the adviser went directly to the police, but told me that there have been a couple of "glitches" like this with 2015 Volts and that I should have the car serviced.

The next day, I dropped the car off at the dealer, who replaced some software coding (and maybe some senors, I just don't remember). When I asked what was wrong, I received "glitch" as a response. That doesn't sit well with me as I am the CIO of a financial institution and know that "glitch" generally means that some human made an error -- either in coding, testing or production.

Second Incident -- Recall
While not identified by me as a problem, the local dealer called to schedule the gas strut change on my 2015 Volt for a recall issue associated with defective parts.

This incident now makes me question the overall build quality of the vehicle and quality control with GM, though I am happy that they've repaired this issue before it was a problem for me.

Though, I was again concerned that if OnStar knew 2015 Volts had OnStar "glitches," why wouldn't they recall the cars for that?

Third Incident -- The Locking Front Breaks
While driving along a semi-rural road (55MPH), my DIC displayed all sorts of icons and problems; associated with breaking, regenerative breaking and the vehicle self-charging system. I contacted OnStar who ran a diagnostic and told me that I needed to take the vehicle in for service.

On my way home, I encountered a driving condition (dog in the road) which required me to "panic" break. This caused the front two tires to lock-up as they were not ABS assisted resulting in two "roached" tires.

The dealer corrected the senor "glitch" with a new sensor on the right wheel, though would not replace the tires. That came out of pocket around $450.

At this point, I am very concerned about the safety and build quality of the vehicle, though I am assured by the dealership that this situation was an abnormality and that I shouldn't have any further problems with the vehicle.

The Forth -- Car Won't Initialize
Attempting to leave work, my vehicle would not initialize. Every DIC light you can possibly think of was engaged and after several attempts to "reset" the car myself (short of pulling the dead-man switch), the car wouldn't go.

I contacted the dealer, who sent a tow truck for the Volt. As luck would have it, when they came, the car worked just fine.

About a day later, I received word that they were able to read the codes from the car (thankfully they were saved) and that the dealer's technician was escalating to General Motors technical support for assistance, as they had never scene this issue.

Fast forward about two weeks, the body panel computer (if I recall properly) had been replaced and once-again, I was asked to collect the vehicle.

This time, I refused. I stated that I no longer trust this vehicle in terms of safety, soundness and reliability and that I request GM buy the vehicle back from me. This was September, 2015.

The Final Insults -- What would you do?
I contacted Volt customer care, who advised me that I needed to work with the dealership to resolve this matter; though they did give me a case number.

I also advised the dealership of what I was told and they promised to work this situation for me, though advised it would be a long process and that GM might not even make a decision in my favor.

Having been a loyal GM (and mostly Chevy owner) since the age of 16, I found it hard to believe that GM wouldn't find in my favor, especially as during these repair situations, I purchased a 2015 Chevy SS and leased a 2015 Chevy Silverado 1500 (specifically to replace the Volt for winter driving).

It's now December, 2015, almost January 2016, and the dealer still has me in a holding pattern and GM customer care has nothing to say to me.

I've now been making lease payments on a vehicle that I deem unsafe for four months, in-addition-to full coverage insurance, as my carrier is concerned that if the dealer or GM drive the vehicle for diagnostic purposes, I would be liable if something happened to the driver, another motorist or the vehicle itself.

Further, I am shocked to search other forums to find that GM has been known to bend over backwards to buy cars back for far less (point in case, a thread I just read about a Cadillac ATS that had no major issues other than body panel and trim alignment issues).

I truly hope that none of you have experienced these problems, though if you have, please post how your situation has been handled.

Thank you for reading, for your suggestions and for this great forum; which allows for the open discussion of such topic. I'm lost at what to do next, short of hiring an Lemon Law Attorney.
 

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In a car with highly integrated systems like the Volt, it is common for a simple problem like a bad connector or ground to cause a whole host of issues. I recommend you ask the dealer to perform a full in-depth electrical system checkout, including the 12V and traction batteries, all connectors, harnesses, and ground connections in particular. Better yet, see if you can get them to send a GM engineer to do it. Then take the car back after they correct any problems found. I'm not a lemon law specialist, but I think you have to give the dealer the opportunity to correct a deficiency, and then, if the problem keeps returning, you may have a case.

For what it's worth, I think you're a bit premature pulling the safety card. Here's why:

The OnStar hit and run "glitch" was an annoyance, not a safety issue. (To be honest, I kinda laughed at that one, too. Sorry :)

The gas strut recall, yes a "safety issue" (using fingers to emphasize the "quotes"). But they fixed it before you had a problem. Side note: someone correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't this fixed before the 2015's came out?

The locking front brakes, although a concern, does not represent an immediate safety problem (the dog might disagree, though :). The fact is, you still had brakes, and the loss of ABS was made known to you via the DIC.

Regarding the failure to initialize, again, not strictly a safety issue. A major inconvenience that eliminated whatever trust you had remaining in the car? Absolutely.

With all that said, I am with you on this, and think it's reasonable to insist the dealer and GM do whatever it takes to restore your confidence in the car. Hopefully, replacing the body control module does the trick, but if it were me, I'd insist on the full electrical checkout.

Good luck and keep us updated.
 

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Though your other incidents were problems, the rear strut issue #2 is a non-issue in your potential lemon law case they found a problem, fixed it, it doesn't make the car into a lemon.

#3 and #4 are really your only real problems with the drivability of the car. The fact that they repaired all the issues but you refuse to take the car back and see if the items are indeed fixed might not help your case. I think lemon law only applies when they have to fix the same problem multiple times and it still plagues the car, though I'm not an attorney.
 

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I also think your experience with this car falls short of a lemon law or buyback scenario, so I don't think you will have luck with GM on this. However, I do understand your loss of confidence in the vehicle. If it were me, and I didn't want the vehicle any more, I would be looking into options to get out of the lease such as transferring it to another person through a lease brokering service, etc.
 

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Good Morning, Volt Owners, Enthusiasts and Possibly GM!

I am seeking guidance and community feedback about a situation that I find myself in with my 2015 Volt.

The Problem, In Short Form
  • Fall, 2014: Leased a new Chevy Volt from my local dealer.
  • November-ish, 2014: Following a normal stop at an intersection, unbeknownst to me, my Volt called OnStar reporting I was in a serious accident and fled the scene -- police are dispatched to my location, who laughed -- I did not.
  • Late Fall, 2014: Recall for the gas struts on rear hatch.
  • Spring, 2015: Front tire sensors cause brake lockup, front tires are ruined (I'm forced to replace out of pocket), system won't charge, etc.
  • Summer, 2015: Car will not start leaving me stranded -- had to have car towed to dealer for repair.
  • Fall/Winter, 2015: Car still sits with dealer (lots of finger pointing).
The Problem In Long Form
During the fall of 2014, I leased a 2015 Chevrolet Volt from my local dealer. Everything was fine for a month, maybe two.

First Incident -- The Case of the OnStar Nanny State
The first problem that I experienced was a "glitch" related to crash sensors and computer software programming (I was told). In this event I was driving along, stopped for a red light, proceeded after the green and continued to my destination. About 30 mins. later, the local police department arrived at the restaurant I was at looking for the owner of a Chevy Volt. After speaking with the officer, he stated that OnStar had called their central dispatch as I had been in a "serious accident and fled the scene." We went out to the parking lot, reviewed the vehicle for damage and he was re-assured that there was no foul-play; even laughing a little about the situation. I was, however, less than amused.

I was shocked that OnStar had registered a problem, I had no indication of it in the vehicle and that no adviser attempted to contact me in the vehicle or on my mobile phone.

I contacted OnStar and spoke with several levels of management, who basically couldn't explain why the adviser went directly to the police, but told me that there have been a couple of "glitches" like this with 2015 Volts and that I should have the car serviced.

The next day, I dropped the car off at the dealer, who replaced some software coding (and maybe some senors, I just don't remember). When I asked what was wrong, I received "glitch" as a response. That doesn't sit well with me as I am the CIO of a financial institution and know that "glitch" generally means that some human made an error -- either in coding, testing or production.

Second Incident -- Recall
While not identified by me as a problem, the local dealer called to schedule the gas strut change on my 2015 Volt for a recall issue associated with defective parts.

This incident now makes me question the overall build quality of the vehicle and quality control with GM, though I am happy that they've repaired this issue before it was a problem for me.

Though, I was again concerned that if OnStar knew 2015 Volts had OnStar "glitches," why wouldn't they recall the cars for that?

Third Incident -- The Locking Front Breaks
While driving along a semi-rural road (55MPH), my DIC displayed all sorts of icons and problems; associated with breaking, regenerative breaking and the vehicle self-charging system. I contacted OnStar who ran a diagnostic and told me that I needed to take the vehicle in for service.

On my way home, I encountered a driving condition (dog in the road) which required me to "panic" break. This caused the front two tires to lock-up as they were not ABS assisted resulting in two "roached" tires.

The dealer corrected the senor "glitch" with a new sensor on the right wheel, though would not replace the tires. That came out of pocket around $450.

At this point, I am very concerned about the safety and build quality of the vehicle, though I am assured by the dealership that this situation was an abnormality and that I shouldn't have any further problems with the vehicle.

The Forth -- Car Won't Initialize
Attempting to leave work, my vehicle would not initialize. Every DIC light you can possibly think of was engaged and after several attempts to "reset" the car myself (short of pulling the dead-man switch), the car wouldn't go.

I contacted the dealer, who sent a tow truck for the Volt. As luck would have it, when they came, the car worked just fine.

About a day later, I received word that they were able to read the codes from the car (thankfully they were saved) and that the dealer's technician was escalating to General Motors technical support for assistance, as they had never scene this issue.

Fast forward about two weeks, the body panel computer (if I recall properly) had been replaced and once-again, I was asked to collect the vehicle.

This time, I refused. I stated that I no longer trust this vehicle in terms of safety, soundness and reliability and that I request GM buy the vehicle back from me. This was September, 2015.

The Final Insults -- What would you do?
I contacted Volt customer care, who advised me that I needed to work with the dealership to resolve this matter; though they did give me a case number.

I also advised the dealership of what I was told and they promised to work this situation for me, though advised it would be a long process and that GM might not even make a decision in my favor.

Having been a loyal GM (and mostly Chevy owner) since the age of 16, I found it hard to believe that GM wouldn't find in my favor, especially as during these repair situations, I purchased a 2015 Chevy SS and leased a 2015 Chevy Silverado 1500 (specifically to replace the Volt for winter driving).

It's now December, 2015, almost January 2016, and the dealer still has me in a holding pattern and GM customer care has nothing to say to me.

I've now been making lease payments on a vehicle that I deem unsafe for four months, in-addition-to full coverage insurance, as my carrier is concerned that if the dealer or GM drive the vehicle for diagnostic purposes, I would be liable if something happened to the driver, another motorist or the vehicle itself.

Further, I am shocked to search other forums to find that GM has been known to bend over backwards to buy cars back for far less (point in case, a thread I just read about a Cadillac ATS that had no major issues other than body panel and trim alignment issues).

I truly hope that none of you have experienced these problems, though if you have, please post how your situation has been handled.

Thank you for reading, for your suggestions and for this great forum; which allows for the open discussion of such topic. I'm lost at what to do next, short of hiring an Lemon Law Attorney.
Sorry...but that would be pouring money down the drain...
http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,4670,7-127-1585_1611-23885--,00.html

From the Michigan Lemon Law

A defective vehicle is one in which the same problem has not been repaired after four attempts, or a vehicle that is out of service 30 days or more for repairs. The first report of the defect must be made within one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser or lessee or during the term of the manufacturer's warranty, whichever period is shorter.

Your refusal to accept the car does nothing to meet the 30 day requirement...:(

If the vehicle you purchase is defective, you may be entitled under state law to replacement of it or a refund of the cost of the lease. To obtain replacement or refund, you must first report the defect in writing to the manufacturer and you may be required to first arbitrate the dispute.

In order to protect your rights under Michigan's Lemon Law, follow these steps:
Keep copies of all correspondence to and from the manufacturer and the dealer.
Keep copies of all work orders for repairs on the vehicle, including the date(s) the work was performed and the mileage on the vehicle at the time of the repair(s).
Follow all requirements of the warranty, including any requirement that the repairs must be done by an authorized dealer specified by the manufacturer.

You need to get an authority to PROVE your vehicle is unsafe...good luck with that...:(

Drive it like you stole it...you may generate enough failure events that would change GM's position...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you, both WheelsUp and llninja for your feedback and reality check of the situation. I, too, am no lemon law expert; though I feel that the three issues with the "glitches" could be identified as a computer and/or electrical problem. I do agree, there is likely a grounding problem in the vehicle that's causing shorts and/or a defective internal voltage regulator on some component. Wouldn't that, though, strengthen my case that this vehicle is not repaired?

I'm not pushing the lemon law thing with GM or the dealer; advocating for them to retain a loyal GM customer. If it comes down to it and they won't do anything for me, in terms of a buy-back, I doubt that I'll pursue legal action -- just turn the other cheek and never buy another GM vehicle. I don't think it's wrong to zero defects; especially as vehicles continue to become more "smart" and "integrated." Maybe, the ideal solution is to go back to 1970s vehicles with a carburetor and no "integration..."

With respect to the "process" of a buy back request, does anyone have an experience/recommendations on whom I should be speaking with? The dealer of GM customer care. This secret seems well protected by GM and the dealership network, with both pointing fingers at each other.
 

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Sorry...but that would be pouring money down the drain...
http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,4670,7-127-1585_1611-23885--,00.html

From the Michigan Lemon Law

A defective vehicle is one in which the same problem has not been repaired after four attempts, or a vehicle that is out of service 30 days or more for repairs. The first report of the defect must be made within one year from the date of delivery to the original purchaser or lessee or during the term of the manufacturer's warranty, whichever period is shorter.

Your refusal to accept the car does nothing to meet the 30 day requirement...:(

If the vehicle you purchase is defective, you may be entitled under state law to replacement of it or a refund of the cost of the lease. To obtain replacement or refund, you must first report the defect in writing to the manufacturer and you may be required to first arbitrate the dispute.

In order to protect your rights under Michigan's Lemon Law, follow these steps:
Keep copies of all correspondence to and from the manufacturer and the dealer.
Keep copies of all work orders for repairs on the vehicle, including the date(s) the work was performed and the mileage on the vehicle at the time of the repair(s).
Follow all requirements of the warranty, including any requirement that the repairs must be done by an authorized dealer specified by the manufacturer.

You need to get an authority to PROVE your vehicle is unsafe...good luck with that...:(

Drive it like you stole it...you may generate enough failure events that would change GM's position...
It looks like I did a number of things wrong... You're probably right, take it back and drive it like I stole it.
 

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I suspect that you are going to be disappointed with the outcome of refusing to pick up the car.

Cars come with a warranty for a reason: to fix issues you may encounter. You have decided that the relatively minor issues you have encountered (including a proactive part replacement) are now a major "safety, soundness and reliability" issue that prevents you from driving or accepting the car and deserves to have GM buy back the car and junk it as a lemon.

  • A sensor component for OnStar over-achieved and a person made a mistake. The dealer replaced the faulty part, someone at OnStar was likely chewed out.
  • GM proactively replaced some struts after a few failed, big deal. The new ones are better. A failing strut could actually hurt someone, unlike OnStar thinking you were in an accident.
  • You used the brakes to avoid a sudden road hazard and burned rubber. GM's fault?
  • The car failed to boot up and the dealer replaced a computer module. No one likes waiting for their car to be worked on, but Stuff Happens.
I can understand not being happy about any of the above. Sure, it would be better if all cars where perfect with zero defects, same for people. But that's not reality. I would take the car back and use it. It's not a lemon based on the above.

I doubt GM is going to buy back your car for the above no matter how dire you describe the issues. But rather than my opinion, go see an attorney about the lemon you think you have. The dealer may try to help in some way, but only for customer goodwill and not because of any legal requirement.
 

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Sorry to hear about your problem Volt. I think you may have more of a problem dealer. The reason I think this is, the strut problem was corrected before your Volt was even built. Our 2011 had the suspect struts, however our 2014 already had the updated struts. Seems unlikely that they would resume using the suspect struts in later builds. If you dealer said they would help resolve this, but hasn't, they may be the problem. Good luck in getting your situation resolved, Volt reps do read at least some of these posts and may contact you.
 

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It sounds like some of these are mountains made from mole hills.

- The OnStar issue seems very odd, and that would frustrate me.
- A recall for the lift gate struts is not a big deal. And essentially every vehicle has recalls. This is a non-issue in my opinion.
- The stopping behavior seems odd. I would maybe have an issue with this but an ABS issue cropping up on a vehicle is far from uncommon, and they fixed it.
- The initializing message, lots of warning messages, and not starting is indicative of a failed 12V battery. Many have observed it. Or sometimes it can be a BCM (rare). When this happens it usually gets replaced and the problem never happens again.

So to me this boils down to a one-off OnStar glitch, and a one-off ABS glitch (the tires didn't spontaneously lock which seemed implied in the short version, but that was caused by heavy braking), both of which were repaired and haven't occurred again.

I would re-evaluate your perception of the few issues you've had and maybe conclude that it's not as big as you're making it out to be. You can certainly choose to never buy another GM vehicle, but I wouldn't expect for a second that you won't see glitches and recalls on other vehicles too. Tesla, for example, has had a ton of recall/maintenance/warranty issues with their vehicles, despite being the most loved automaker on the planet. And Toyota has had a ton of recalls as well.
 

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It looks like I did a number of things wrong... You're probably right, take it back and drive it like I stole it.
Agreed, you had a rotten string of luck in a short period of time, but the car has a bumper to bumper warranty for 3 years, so just use it. If it continues to have electrical problems, then you might have a lemon law case, until then enjoy the ride.
 

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1. The onstar thing was certainly weird. I would rather have the fake accident failure though then if you were in a real accident and it did not work.

2. lift gate struts. These are just the little struts that hold up the lift gate hatch when you are getting something out of the hatch. The failure was in the fastener that holds the strut to the body. If it failed, the hatch would drop a bit and the end of the strut could damage the body of the car. It would take both sides to fail at the same time to be worse but that would be very unlikely. It was a precautionary recall. Nothing mechanical to the car performance.

3. Wheels lock up from 55mph when avoiding dog. Aside from leaving a bit of rubber on the road, it is very unlikely that it took off enough rubber to affect the tire in any major way. I would not have bothered to replace the tires unless they were significantly flat spotted and you could feel it when driving.

4. Sounds like the car was put into maintenance mode which I think is what happens when you push the start button twice quickly ( or something like that ). I think the trick is to know that is what happened and then there is a simple process to get out of the mode.

5. Have the dealer apply all updates available and car is probably fine. Like other new cars, things can go wrong but warranty fixes them. In the case of the Volt, because of its complexity and lack of dealer knowledge, it takes longer to diagnose due to calls back and forth with GM for what normally would be a simple fix on a regular car.

I have never owned a vehicle that has not had to have something addressed under warranty. The last one was on my Buick, the AWD transfer case chewed itself up. Took 10 days for parts, I got a loaner and all was fixed and good in the end. Just part of vehicle ownership these days ( domestic and foreign I believe ).
 

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As said: Your state has a Lemon Law.
Either you qualify, or you don't.

This is the biggie to me: [don't] replace the tires unless they were significantly flat spotted and you could feel it when driving.

Modern cars with ABS do not flat spot tires, period. The ABS must have gone nuts for that to happen. A SERIOUS Safety issue.

You don't hear "Screeeeech,,, Crash-Bam" during collisions these days. Only the 'Crash-Bam' part.

Hint: BBB has a system to help you with the Lemon Law,,, if you qualify.
 

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Recalling the bad old days of ICE cars I have owned, whenever there was an electrical problem 9 out of 10 times it could be traced to the battery--either the battery itself or cables and grounding. Perhaps your dealer would be willing to let you use a loaner battery as a test--should the problem not yet be fixed.Here's a question that an hour or two of manual study might answer: what do you lose when the battery is disconnected even momentarily?
 

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Forgive me, what's an ICE car?
Internal combustion engine, but more precisely, the old cars with transmissions, engines, no regen, etc. The early 80s were the dark times when we had the X car, the K car, and the Japanese were whipping our butts in quality and reliability.
 

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Internal combustion engine, but more precisely, the old cars with transmissions, engines, no regen, etc.
I hate, for fear of being black listed, but ... could some of this forum's love of the Volt and it's predecessor the EV1 be influencing the dialog not to push further? I mean, it's a cute car -- neat concept, but not a religion.
 

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I hate, for fear of being black listed, but ... could some of this forum's love of the Volt and it's predecessor the EV1 be influencing the dialog not to push further? I mean, it's a cute car -- neat concept, but not a religion.
I'm all for a pure electric with 300+ miles of range that charges in 15 minutes and is the size of a suburban that doesn't require me to be a millionaire to afford one. As much as I like my volt, I fully accept that this is an interim vehicle until the technology advances so we can have all day battery life or a mr. Fusion on board.

You're going to need to be a lot worse, more obstinate, and start calling people names and saying really bad things to get blacklisted

Edit: ok misinterpreted tkep194's statement. But no. I think many of us ready your points, and looked at it from A 3rd party bystander's standpoint, and you don't have much to stand on with a buyback case or a lemon law case. At lease not yet. Document everything that has happened so far, and if it continues to be a systemic problem, then you may have a valid claim.
 

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I do business with that dealer. They have sold a number of Volts and the service department is competent to service Volts. Hard for me to believe that if you have leased 3 vehicles from them they're aren't bending over backwards to resolve your problem.
 

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I hate, for fear of being black listed, but ... could some of this forum's love of the Volt and it's predecessor the EV1 be influencing the dialog not to push further? I mean, it's a cute car -- neat concept, but not a religion.
Blacklisted? I have to assume you are joking.

What kind of pushing further are you referring to?

Pushing GM to buy back the car? No one is stopping the OP from pursuing that. However, I am trying to brace them for the likely outcome. Lemon laws are pretty specific as to what qualifies, regardless of whether the car is a Volt, Cruze, Ford truck, or something else. Frankly, any of the issues (OnStar, ABS, computer control module, hardware replacement) can and do happen to other cars that are not Volts. The fact that there were a couple of different issues fixed under warranty would not be enough to get anyone's attention (GM, dealer, judges) in my opinion. If it were me, I would not waste my time, money or emotions pursuing this. YMMV.
 
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