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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Did you perform the test without A/C or fans running? We are interested in how much energy the battery can provide to propel the car.

If your Volt is running well but you are not getting the range you once got, I wouldn’t worry too much. You still have a good car. As long as the aging battery cells are still properly balancing, you will be able to drive the car for a long time. Your ICE generator will kick in sooner and you will burn gas to continue generating electricity to get you to your destination.

I look in the mirror and see that I don’t look like I did 8 years ago, but I’m still waking up each morning and getting out of bed, so I’m satisfied 8^)
Thank you. But I do not want to burn gas. I want to use my battery. I can still use it for short runs and keep charging. But sad that Chevy does not replace battery so I could use for another 8 - 9 years. Again, thank you all for your assistance.
 

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But sad that Chevy does not replace battery so I could use for another 8 - 9 years. Again, thank you all for your assistance.
Your battery is not failing. I'm not sure why you are so insistent on getting a new battery. Batteries age.

My 2011 had an EPA range of 35 miles range when it was new. I now am getting 30-35 miles. The fact I was getting high 40's for many years was a bonus. The 2013/15 model year Volt EPA all-electric range is 38 mi.

It makes no sense to replace the battery just because your miles have dropped a little below what the car was originally specified to get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Your battery is not failing. I'm not sure why you are so insistent on getting a new battery. Batteries age.

My 2011 had an EPA range of 35 miles range when it was new. I now am getting 30-35 miles. The fact I was getting high 40's for many years was a bonus. The 2013/15 model year Volt EPA all-electric range is 38 mi.

It makes no sense to replace the battery just because your miles have dropped a little below what the car was originally specified to get.
Yes, you are correct. I am getting 32 miles per charge usually now. But it reduced so quickly - in a matter of weeks -- from 40 then to 35, now to 30 - 32; so that it makes me worried that it is reducing too fast. Not over a year, but in weeks it lost 8-10 miles per charge. I am not selling this wonderful car yet, and I hope I will not get further reduction so soon. It still makes me angry that Chevrolet, knowing that batteries age, has not stepped up to service these wonderful Volts after the 10 years - with either new batteries or fixing these old batteries .
Again, thank you to all of you for your assistance.
 

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It still makes me angry that Chevrolet, knowing that batteries age, has not stepped up to service these wonderful Volts after the 10 years - with either new batteries or fixing these old batteries .
I'm confused you'd be angry. GM announced a Gen 1 Battery Pack Refurbish Kit in April, TSB 19-NA-242 GM. TSB 19-NA-242 GM Gen 1 Battery Pack Refurbish Kit

They did what you are saying they should do. :)

The dealer can replace a module, or a section (several modules) or the whole battery pack (3 sections). The cost will be several thousand minimum (my guess) to maybe $20k for a whole new battery (my guess). I don't think it's worth even a few thousand to get back 5-8 miles or so of range. To add an extra 10 miles every day for a year would be about $460 for gas at $5/gal, 40 MPG. If you don't want to use gas, consider trading for a used Bolt. My Bolt has a 260 mile battery range, it never uses gas.

Many things affect range besides battery range. AC/fan use in the summer is a big one. So are driving style, higher speeds, new tires, lower tire pressure.
 

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Thank you. But I do not want to burn gas. I want to use my battery. I can still use it for short runs and keep charging. But sad that Chevy does not replace battery so I could use for another 8 - 9 years. Again, thank you all for your assistance.
There's no reason to worry about burning gas, it's what the car is designed to do, which makes it much more functional. I've gone from never having to burn gas for the work commute, to using a tenth of a gallon each time due to normal battery degradation. Overall, I typically use about 4 gallons a week.
 

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Yes, you are correct. I am getting 32 miles per charge usually now. But it reduced so quickly - in a matter of weeks -- from 40 then to 35, now to 30 - 32; so that it makes me worried that it is reducing too fast. Not over a year, but in weeks it lost 8-10 miles per charge. I am not selling this wonderful car yet, and I hope I will not get further reduction so soon. It still makes me angry that Chevrolet, knowing that batteries age, has not stepped up to service these wonderful Volts after the 10 years - with either new batteries or fixing these old batteries .
Again, thank you to all of you for your assistance.
Unfortunately one day the battery will fail, and there won't be good replacement options available. I've said here before, the math doesn't work out for any EV unless you drive a lot of miles. (FYI, Replacement Tesla batteries are in the $15k-$20k+ range.) Most people are better off with a regular gas car or hybrid. The good news is, this is the best time you'll ever have to sell it if you are not happy, due to the used car market valuation.

On my end, I don't plan on keeping mine for more than 8-10 years, as I don't want to be stuck with a bad battery. Keeping quarterly data on the battery condition provides me some insurance and peace of mind.

All that said, nothing sticks out to me as abnormal for yours at this time. Just keep an eye on it, or take advantage of the current market conditions and sell it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I'm confused you'd be angry. GM announced a Gen 1 Battery Pack Refurbish Kit in April, TSB 19-NA-242 GM. TSB 19-NA-242 GM Gen 1 Battery Pack Refurbish Kit

They did what you are saying they should do. :)

The dealer can replace a module, or a section (several modules) or the whole battery pack (3 sections). The cost will be several thousand minimum (my guess) to maybe $20k for a whole new battery (my guess). I don't think it's worth even a few thousand to get back 5-8 miles or so of range. To add an extra 10 miles every day for a year would be about $460 for gas at $5/gal, 40 MPG. If you don't want to use gas, consider trading for a used Bolt. My Bolt has a 260 mile battery range, it never uses gas.

Many things affect range besides battery range. AC/fan use in the summer is a big one. So are driving style, higher speeds, new tires, lower tire pressure.
Thank you Steverino. I did not know that GM can replace a module... that is good to know. When it gets a little lower mileage, I will look into that. Thank you!
 

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Thank you. But I do not want to burn gas. I want to use my battery. I can still use it for short runs and keep charging. But sad that Chevy does not replace battery so I could use for another 8 - 9 years. Again, thank you all for your assistance.
Keep in mind your 2014 Volt uses the battery ALL the time. The car is propelled 100% of the time by the larger electric motor. The Gen 1 Volt is a "battery-operated device" (like a flashlight or cell phone), and the battery is not a fuel storage container, but a portable generator. Inside the cell, a chemical reaction creates the output power. When fully charged, the reaction can be quite robust. When you are just cruising down the road, only a moderate level of output is asked, but when you floor the accelerator, you may be asking the battery pack cells to create 100 kW or more of peak power (to compare, charging from the wall at 240 volts is less than 4 kW of output).

As the cell is discharged, that chemical reaction gradually slows down. The ability of the cell to create the output power at the desired strength diminishes. Eventually, the cell can’t produce enough output to meet the demand (think of a cell phone dropping a call or a flashlight beam starting to fade). GM has programmed the Volt to start the gas engine and switch automatically to Charge Sustaining Mode before the battery pack cell voltage drops this far.

Like all battery-operated devices, the Volt functions better when the battery is charged, and your Volt’s battery is a rechargeable battery. Over time the environment within the cells may deteriorate, causing the cells to lose some overall capacity (i.e., the kWh Used per full charge), but when the cells are operating within the Electric Mode limits, the battery pack should remain relatively capable of meeting the fueling needs of the motor.

The Gen 1 Volt is also unusual among these types of plug-in cars, in that once you’ve run out of Electric Mode power or you switch to Charge Sustaining Mode by using Hold Mode, the car continues to be propelled by the electric motor. There’s no "automobile engine" under the hood that takes over the task of accelerating the car and then propelling it at speed. GM’s "range extender" concept is quite intriguing. In Electric Mode, the battery supplies both acceleration power (high draw, short time) and speed maintaining power (low draw, long time). In Charge Sustaining Mode (Hold Mode or fully depleted battery), acceleration power is still provided by the battery (when you floor the accelerator, that 100 kW+ of output can only be supplied by the battery), but now it’s generator output that provides the lower level of power for maintaining speed (generator output is also used to recharge the battery so it’s ready for the next acceleration episode). As long as there’s fuel for the generator (i.e, gas), the Gen 1 Volt can continue down the road on electric power.

Granted, I’m ignoring the low-torque conditions under which the generator may also be clutched to the drivetrain to allow engine torque to contribute to propulsion torque, but when you drive your 2014 Volt beyond battery range, in effect, you are STILL using the battery to accelerate the car, and you are STILL using electricity to maintain speed (but now you also need to burn gas to create the gas-generated electricity to maintain the speed)... and if you know the trip is going to be long enough to be beyond battery range, you should use Hold Mode when there’s still, say, 2-4 green bars of grid power, so that the "range extender" is doing its thing with the battery pack cell voltage still at a "healthy chemical reaction in the cell" level. Then when you know you can finish the trip using those final 2-4 green bars, you switch back to Normal.
 

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In my experience the kwh used number is really just an educated guess. I have a 2014 with 80,000 mi and on a good day with like 70° f, fan only, with moderate driving with a mix of hilly back roads and highway I tend to get like 42 MI before the engine comes on. The display will tell me 9.8 KW hours used.

But I usually get somewhere between 33 and 38 miles depending on outside temperature, climate controls, and how much highway or interstate driving I do. The display will still say 9.8 KW hours used.

About a year and a half ago I would get to 10.4 kilowatt hours used before the engine would turn on but I honestly can't tell a difference in actual range it seems to be the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Keep in mind your 2014 Volt uses the battery ALL the time. The car is propelled 100% of the time by the larger electric motor. The Gen 1 Volt is a "battery-operated device" (like a flashlight or cell phone), and the battery is not a fuel storage container, but a portable generator. Inside the cell, a chemical reaction creates the output power. When fully charged, the reaction can be quite robust. When you are just cruising down the road, only a moderate level of output is asked, but when you floor the accelerator, you may be asking the battery pack cells to create 100 kW or more of peak power (to compare, charging from the wall at 240 volts is less than 4 kW of output).

As the cell is discharged, that chemical reaction gradually slows down. The ability of the cell to create the output power at the desired strength diminishes. Eventually, the cell can’t produce enough output to meet the demand (think of a cell phone dropping a call or a flashlight beam starting to fade). GM has programmed the Volt to start the gas engine and switch automatically to Charge Sustaining Mode before the battery pack cell voltage drops this far.

Like all battery-operated devices, the Volt functions better when the battery is charged, and your Volt’s battery is a rechargeable battery. Over time the environment within the cells may deteriorate, causing the cells to lose some overall capacity (i.e., the kWh Used per full charge), but when the cells are operating within the Electric Mode limits, the battery pack should remain relatively capable of meeting the fueling needs of the motor.

The Gen 1 Volt is also unusual among these types of plug-in cars, in that once you’ve run out of Electric Mode power or you switch to Charge Sustaining Mode by using Hold Mode, the car continues to be propelled by the electric motor. There’s no "automobile engine" under the hood that takes over the task of accelerating the car and then propelling it at speed. GM’s "range extender" concept is quite intriguing. In Electric Mode, the battery supplies both acceleration power (high draw, short time) and speed maintaining power (low draw, long time). In Charge Sustaining Mode (Hold Mode or fully depleted battery), acceleration power is still provided by the battery (when you floor the accelerator, that 100 kW+ of output can only be supplied by the battery), but now it’s generator output that provides the lower level of power for maintaining speed (generator output is also used to recharge the battery so it’s ready for the next acceleration episode). As long as there’s fuel for the generator (i.e, gas), the Gen 1 Volt can continue down the road on electric power.

Granted, I’m ignoring the low-torque conditions under which the generator may also be clutched to the drivetrain to allow engine torque to contribute to propulsion torque, but when you drive your 2014 Volt beyond battery range, in effect, you are STILL using the battery to accelerate the car, and you are STILL using electricity to maintain speed (but now you also need to burn gas to create the gas-generated electricity to maintain the speed)... and if you know the trip is going to be long enough to be beyond battery range, you should use Hold Mode when there’s still, say, 2-4 green bars of grid power, so that the "range extender" is doing its thing with the battery pack cell voltage still at a "healthy chemical reaction in the cell" level. Then when you know you can finish the trip using those final 2-4 green bars, you switch back to Normal.
thank you! This information is good to know. I really appreciate it. I will follow you advice.
 

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In my experience the kwh used number is really just an educated guess. I have a 2014 with 80,000 mi and on a good day with like 70° f, fan only, with moderate driving with a mix of hilly back roads and highway I tend to get like 42 MI before the engine comes on. The display will tell me 9.8 KW hours used.

But I usually get somewhere between 33 and 38 miles depending on outside temperature, climate controls, and how much highway or interstate driving I do. The display will still say 9.8 KW hours used.

About a year and a half ago I would get to 10.4 kilowatt hours used before the engine would turn on but I honestly can't tell a difference in actual range it seems to be the same.
Yes, it's not a direct reading, like a water meter. It's interpolated data, it's data run through some algorithms based on some assumptions. Educated guess is more appropriate than thinking it's like a speedometer.
 

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I have a 2011, so mine has less info displayed, but yours being a 2014 should show in the center display (when you hit the leaf button) the amount of miles driven and the amount of energy consumed in kW-h.

Here is my screen, yours will show kW-h next to the electric miles driven (I think) where mine shows gas miles driven.
View attachment 174522
Kwh will be where yours shows total miles. Total miles got moved to the other side next to Energy efficiency.
 
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