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2013 Volt won't pass a smog test

4419 Views 51 Replies 17 Participants Last post by  Steverino
I had the charger receptacle replaced after waiting 2+ months for the part to come in but while waiting my tags became expired. Smog station said fail but I have no warning lights on . Took it back to the dealership and they said still no codes. So now what do I do?
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Lack of details.

Smog station didn't have any more details than 'failed'?

You need to run on gas/ICE for X number of miles so that there is emissions data. That may vary by region or state.
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Lack of details.

Smog station didn't have any more details than 'failed'?

You need to run on gas/ICE for X number of miles so that there is emissions data. That may vary by region or state.
I drove it approx. 100 miles in hold mode before getting the smog check. So should I drive it another 100 miles on hold mode. Also should the driving be via freeway or city driving or does it matter? 2013 Volt with 96,000 miles. I'm in California. I've owned the car since 2016 and I love my Volt. Thank you for responding.
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Freeway driving will be the best way to exercise the engine, if the flow of traffic is traveling at the speed limit.

There is a procedure if a car fails a smog test, the car must go to a place where they try to fix what is causing it to fail. There is a maximum limit for how much you must spend. Then they will arbitrate.
did it fail, or they said it wasn't ready to test due to incomplete I/M flags?
if it failed, for what parameter did it fail?
any replacements/repairs in the months prior to fail?
did it fail, or they said it wasn't ready to test due to incomplete I/M flags?
if it failed, for what parameter did it fail?
any replacements/repairs in the months prior to fail?
I had the charging receptacle replaced after a 2 month wait from a supply shortage. During that time my tags expired. But now it's fixed and I took it to test and smog tech. Said fail. My car runs perfect so I don't get it. 2023 Volt 96,000 mi. Southern California I feel like a sitting duck waiting to get a ticket or towed.
Almost seems unnecessary to say, but did they open the hood to allow the engine to run during the test? First time I took mine in for an emissions test, the guy came back out to me and asked how to start the engine.. It's possible the person who tested your car was unfamiliar with how the car should be tested. Just a thought.....
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I would assume that the emission test place would give you a report of what failed. Without more info, hard to give any advice on where to go...

When is the last time the plugs were changed? air filter? How often do you drive on gasoline? What was the result of the most recent passing emission test? Has the 12V battery been replaced (or allowed to completely die) in the last several months? if so, since then how far have you driven on gasoline? how frequently?

Depending on what "fail" means, there could be a simple solution such as completing the requisite number of drive cycles. Essentially driving (on ICE) from coolant at ambient temp to above a certain threshold (i.e. fully warmed up engine) a certain number of times (likely >3). Possibly even traveling a certain number of miles (on ICE) above a certain speed (likely 10-20 miles over 55mph from what others here have posted, possibly without using the brakes). I am really surprised the dealership was not more helpful and willing to liberate more dollars from your pocketbook. Also surprised the e-test place wasn't able to provide a tiny bit of guidance. In failing tests from my long ago past, the e-test station would give a print out with the failing parameters (i.e. CO, NOx, VOC, etc...) with a canned suggestion on what may be causing the failure (plugs, filter, timing, etc...)
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I would assume that the emission test place would give you a report of what failed. Without more info, hard to give any advice on where to go...
...there could be a simple solution such as completing the requisite number of drive cycles. Essentially driving (on ICE) from coolant at ambient temp to above a certain threshold (i.e. fully warmed up engine) a certain number of times .....
There is a set of 'readiness' parameters that are required to indicate they are, and have been, monitoring for faults. These are used to prevent an owner from clearing any fault codes immediately prior to turning the car over for the inspector to check. Use of a scan tool to erase faults also re-sets the readiness flags. If the dealer re-set the ECU following the service work, the car is likely OK with no faults, but the readiness doesn't (yet) indicate that is a long term status. Do NOT try to clear any imagined "secret" or "hidden" fault codes or the readiness count will have to re-start warm-up cycle counts from zero.
Search for a specific set of cycle requirements (min start temperature, min end temp, minimum time duration, number of cycle repeats) needed to satisfy the readiness flags.
Me? I'd drive it as if the charger port were out of commission, using ICE when there is a long enough duration of use to get to operating temp, and then a long enough off time to cool off for another heat-up on the next (or return) trip to speed up the readiness restoration process.
I'm in MA, but we follow the CARB emissions requirements here.
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Almost seems unnecessary to say, but did they open the hood to allow the engine to run during the test? First time I took mine in for an emissions test, the guy came back out to me and asked how to start the engine.. It's possible the person who tested your car was unfamiliar with how the car should be tested. Just a thought.....
Curious. In Chicagoland, they just plug into the OBDII port to collect data (given enough ICE running time). Years ago they put some monitor sensors in the tailpipe.
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did it fail, or they said it wasn't ready to test due to incomplete I/M flags?
if it failed, for what parameter did it fail?
any replacements/repairs in the months prior to fail?
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these are the test results
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Google search on GM-Volt. com for P0D26 -- P0D26 site:gm-volt.com - Google Search

P0D26:
P0D26 = Battery Charger System Precharge Time Too Long.

"This diagnostic tests whether precharge has occurred in the appropriate amount of time in a characteristic way. The target voltage is battery pack voltage. A deviation or deadband around pack voltage is calculated in the form of a percentage deviation. To have a successful or passing precharge, the bus voltage must rise and be within the calculated deadband window for a continuous time of at least 0.25 seconds and before 10 seconds has elapsed since the beginning of precharge."

This sounds like something to take to the dealer.

From our past resident expert WOT from this thread: Chirp Chirp Chirp Check Engine (P0D26)
Won't likely be a battery issue."Precharge" time is more related to the battery connection "handshake" during charging maneuvers and during system power up.Since this appears to manifest only during charging, that seems likely. But there HAS been some software issues with certain "signal timing" issues during this handshake on early cars.

Specifically there is a bulletin for this DTC that is related to intermittent issues with the proximity signal created by the EVSE, the charging module and/or plug-in connections. If this only fails using one charger and not another this is highly likely. There was also a software update for certain early cars that changed the behavior of this DTC slightly to prevent false triggering. If your VIN is prior to BU100954 you may need this series of software updates released to remedy some "false" DTCs . In any case if you visit your dealer have them refer to PIP4905 (P0D26 specific) and potentially PIP4875 (the software reflash bullletin).

WOT
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View attachment 176372 these are the test results
There is a set of 'readiness' parameters that are required to indicate they are, and have been, monitoring for faults. These are used to prevent an owner from clearing any fault codes immediately prior to turning the car over for the inspector to check. Use of a scan tool to erase faults also re-sets the readiness flags. If the dealer re-set the ECU following the service work, the car is likely OK with no faults, but the readiness doesn't (yet) indicate that is a long term status. Do NOT try to clear any imagined "secret" or "hidden" fault codes or the readiness count will have to re-start warm-up cycle counts from zero.
Search for a specific set of cycle requirements (min start temperature, min end temp, minimum time duration, number of cycle repeats) needed to satisfy the readiness flags.
Me? I'd drive it as if the charger port were out of commission, using ICE when there is a long enough duration of use to get to operating temp, and then a long enough off time to cool off for another heat-up on the next (or return) trip to speed up the readiness restoration process.
I'm in MA, but we follow the CARB emissions requirements here.
I had the charge receptacle replaced after a 2 month wait for the part to come in and I believe the damage came from using a faulty Charge Point public charger. As soon as I got back to my car it showed no charge and and the check engine light came on. Now that it's repaired and no warning lights are on. It won't pass a smog. I drove it approx. 100 miles on the 405 Fwy at between 65-80 mph on hold mode because the dealership charged it after installing the charge port. Also I almost always drive my car on gas because there are no charging stations near my house. So should I keep driving in hold mode? Also I drive my Volt in Low so I don't have to ride my brakes. Am I driving it the wrong way. It runs perfect other than not passing a smog test. It's my only car and I love it!
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I had the charge receptacle replaced after a 2 month wait for the part to come in and I believe the damage came from using a faulty Charge Point public charger. As soon as I got back to my car it showed no charge and and the check engine light came on. Now that it's repaired and no warning lights are on.
I'd consider taking it back to the dealer and show them that there is still a fault that seems to be related to their service done.
Perhaps they can reset this "Permanent Fault Code" [P0D26 = Battery Charger System Precharge Time Too Long.] or suggest what to do related to the failed smog test.

Aside: what level is your battery at when you constantly drive it on Hold Mode? Mountain Mode may be similar and let you use more of the battery.
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View attachment 176372 these are the test results
So it failed because there was a DTC showing. That's normal.

P0D26 NORMALLY disables charging, but ... you won't know that because you don't charge your car.

What P0D26 means is that part of the routine for charging the car is failing. Before the charger (the one behind the bumper, not the EVSE) is connected to the battery, it has to ramp up the charge on the output terminals to something approaching the voltage in the battery, so that when the connection is made, very little arcing happens. If the voltages are close, no drama. If they voltages are wildly different, big sparks, blows minuscule parts of the contactors into vapor until eventually the connection goes bad, so the pre-charge tries to minimize that.

HOWEVER: That's not related to the charging port. At all. That's between the charger and the HPCM2, and USUALLY the problem is either a contactor stuck open, or a fault in the charger that necessitates replacing the charger. Which is not cheap and probably won't happen in 20 days.
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The obvious solution is to show the dealership the smog check station's report so they have information about why the car didn't pass smog.
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The obvious solution is to show the dealership the smog check station's report so they have information about why the car didn't pass smog.
I did show them. I went right back to them and showed the test results and they gave me a DTC Report that reads:
Code B3109 Keyless Entry Transmitter 1 Battery
Failure Code 0x00. Status History
That's it.
I did show them. I went right back to them and showed the test results and they gave me a DTC Report that reads:
Code B3109 Keyless Entry Transmitter 1 Battery
Failure Code 0x00. Status History
That's it.
I think this is the number for GM customer care -- (800) 222-1020 . Since you are in CA with strict emissions, they may be able to push the right button at your dealership to look into this further or have suggestions about the failure at emissions. Just spit-balling.
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In Illinois, error's that don't affect the gas engine emissions are not supposed to result in a smog test failure. So a keyless entry error or even a high voltage plug in charging issue would not affect tailpipe emissions and theoretically not result in an emission test failure. In practice, I don't know.
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I did show them. I went right back to them and showed the test results and they gave me a DTC Report that reads:
Code B3109 Keyless Entry Transmitter 1 Battery
Failure Code 0x00. Status History
That's it.
But that's a different code than the one noted on the smog failure sheet? Are they ignoring that one or....?
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