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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying to rebuild a Volt not as a drive-able Volt, but for the drive unit itself. The car is destroyed. What I have found is the airbag sensors need a 2.4 ohm resistor to fool the car into thinking the airbag is still functional. But I also found the seatbelt retractors act the same way. They have little explosive device that acts like an airbag and shoots steel balls into the retractor and tightens the belt to your body during a crash.

The car wont charge, won't power up the drive, several errors for airbags, communications..... The front end was damaged, loss of radiators and the controller was slightly hit causing a wire or two to be cut. I'm simulating airbags with the resistors and resetting codes as I go.

If successful, I'll probably see if I can use the Volts entire drive and electrical system in a 1963 Chevy II. A lot of work, but I'm bored.

It would be alot easier if I ever find a Volt that is totaled from a rear or side collision.
 

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Sounds like a cool project! Please continue to post tips like this and pics as needed, F16BMATHIS.
 

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There needs to be a software reset after a crash. I think you can DIY with the correct cable, a laptop, and a subscription to the GM software update service. No, I don't know how to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds like a cool project! Please continue to post tips like this and pics as needed, F16BMATHIS.
I've simulated the Airbag sensors and seatbelt sensors with 2.4 ohm resistors. The seatbelt errors still show a potentiometer fault, but there's no more wiring, so I'm guessing the resistance was incorrect or I'm missing something. I attempted to bypass the front crash sensors with the same resistors, but even though that code cleared, it now shows shorted to ground. I'll try different resistance hoping that will work, or measure the original sensor, or worst case, re-install it by repairing the wiring. And I would like to see what the airbag resistance is by measuring the passenger airbag (It didn't fire) being careful not to fire it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There needs to be a software reset after a crash. I think you can DIY with the correct cable, a laptop, and a subscription to the GM software update service. No, I don't know how to do it.
I have an AUTEL MaxiCOM 808. It resets codes, and can update software, $500 or so on Amazon.
 

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Yes, that's a good scanner. But it's not going to do what you need.
 

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If you join the Facebook group, "Chevy Volt DIY repair and modding group", there are several people familiar with the GDS2 set up needed and might be able to help reprogram the car. Once you can talk to the car, a two-day subscription to GM might be necessary. I recall $40 as the cost after everything else of course.
 

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It does sound like a cool project. Btw, if you need something smallish from my parts car, I'll check on it for you. Many of the expensive components have been sold, but some things are left. I imagine your car was hit up front like most. I sometimes make trips to WI too from here in NM.
 

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Depending on how much current was being drawn when the airbags be played, the main contractor on the battery may need to replaced. It opens at airbag deployment and the resulting arc usually kills it.
 

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The airbag module, called the Sensing and Diagnostic Module, or Inflatable Restraint Sensing and Diagnostic Module, needs to be replaced after a crash. It sets latched codes that can’t be cleared and requires replacement. Once replaced, it will also need to be programmed, and set up with other modules on the car. Installing resistors may work for fooling the SDM. I also can’t remember what else needs to be done, but there are likely crash codes set in other modules, like HPCM and HPCM2. Those modules open the battery contactors in crash events. If memory serves, there are seven sets of contactors in the battery assembly.
 
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