GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,
I got a 2013 second hand volt at 140k miles. I just took off the spark plugs myself and realized that they are all ACDelco ones with part number 55585534, or ACDelco 41-122. Can someone tell me if this is the original spark plug or it has been changed.
Thanks!

Update, I did my own spark plug change. Details are here:

Taking out the engine cover, 2 bolts and two air hoses. Then take out the ignition coil and then spark plug.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-zGJL87Hro

My previous owner had the spark plug changed already, however, the dealer he used put in some bad ACDelco ones that was leaking.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIhYevf1Klc
I ended up breaking one of the ignition coil boots.
I had to make my own tool to get the broken piece out, it was a 12.7mm outer diameter, ~10 mm inner diameter aluminum tube, flared a little at the top.
We learned the lesson and bought dielectric grease:
https://www.acehardware.com/departm...mR2CTr0ipsWnAen296OBlKRVSk-2XKsRoC3A4QAvD_BwE
The replacement boot can be found at
https://www.oreillyauto.com/detail/...=Ultima+Select+Wires+Coil+On+Plug+Boot&pos=63
$8 each piece, if someone finds a cheaper one, let me know.

Before putting in the spark plug, make sure you have gapped it correctly, the tool is only $5 but in my experience it makes a lot of difference in the engine noise. The gap should be 0.7mm according to the service manual.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zrH2OQV0P4
The process of putting in the spark plug. The toque required is 216 Lb*in.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60nQqj05nE8

The torque for the ignition coil is 71 lb*in.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVzefKyVs3Y
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Hi all,
I got a 2013 second hand volt at 140k miles. I just took off the spark plugs myself and realized that they are all ACDelco ones with part number 5558534. Can someone tell me if this is the original spark plug or it has been changed.
Thanks!
My 2013 Owners Manual lists GM Part # 55564962 for the spark plugs. The AC Delco # is listed as 41-119.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
The OEM plugs are rebranded NGK
IFR7X7G.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
According to the AcDelco website, the replacement spark plug for the 2012 through 2015 Volt is 41-122.

https://parts-catalog.acdelco.com/catalog/catalog_search.php

My 2014 owners manual states that the gap range is 0.024 - 0.027 inch. I just used a feeler gauge to measure the gap on the 41-122 plugs I bought to replace mine when I reach 97,000 miles (currently at 91,253). As best that I can measure, the gap is more than 0.025 and less than 0.027 inch out of the box. AcDelco states that the gap is 0.028 inch. That's close enough for government work in my book.

I'd sure like to find out the difference between 41-119 and 41-122. Google isn't a help. Anyone know???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
According to the AcDelco website, the replacement spark plug for the 2012 through 2015 Volt is 41-122.

https://parts-catalog.acdelco.com/catalog/catalog_search.php

My 2014 owners manual states that the gap range is 0.024 - 0.027 inch. I just used a feeler gauge to measure the gap on the 41-122 plugs I bought to replace mine when I reach 97,000 miles (currently at 91,253). As best that I can measure, the gap is more than 0.025 and less than 0.027 inch out of the box. AcDelco states that the gap is 0.028 inch. That's close enough for government work in my book.

I'd sure like to find out the difference between 41-119 and 41-122. Google isn't a help. Anyone know???
41-119 and 41-122 only differ in the "heat range" of the plugs. Go with the 41-122 as these plugs have a lower heat range and thus resist carbon build up better when the engine isn't at operating temperatures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
41-119 and 41-122 only differ in the "heat range" of the plugs. Go with the 41-122 as these plugs have a lower heat range and thus resist carbon build up better when the engine isn't at operating temperatures.
Thanks for this. I didn't have luck searching. Where did you get this info? I'd like to read about it.

EDIT; I think that you have the heat range effect backwards. A hotter plug will burn off the carbon, etc. faster than a cold plug. Thus, using a hotter plug in an engine that won't be operating for a long period of time at running temperature will be better at self-cleaning than a cold plug in this environment. The Gen 1 Volt ICE probably fits this category due to on-off operation at low vehicle speeds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
Thanks for this. I didn't have luck searching. Where did you get this info? I'd like to read about it.

EDIT; I think that you have the heat range effect backwards. A hotter plug will burn off the carbon, etc. faster than a cold plug. Thus, using a hotter plug in an engine that won't be operating for a long period of time at running temperature will be better at self-cleaning than a cold plug in this environment. The Gen 1 Volt ICE probably fits this category due to on-off operation at low vehicle speeds.
GM used the same Ecotec LUx 1.4 liter series engines in the 2011-2016 Limited Cruze LT, ECO, and LTZ, the Sonic LT and LTZ, and the 2010-2015 Volt. CruzeTalk.com and SonicOwnersForum.com have had a lot of discussions on the correct spark plugs as well as mappings from the NGK plug numbers to the ACDelco plug numbers. NGK makes the plugs for this engine.

In addition to changing the OEM plug number, GM Powertrain changed the plug gap from 0.035" to 0.025-0.028" for the Cruze and Sonic applications. It appears the Volt was always in the lower range (0.025 to 0.028").

And you're correct, I got the heat range impact backwards. In the Volt you want to use the higher heat range because the engine doesn't run as hard and frequently not long enough to burn off any carbon buildups.

CruzeTalk members tested several different spark plugs and what we found was that the OEM plugs are the longest lasting plugs, but from a performance standpoint they're the worst performing plugs, especially at low RPM when the turbo hadn't spooled up. The best performing plugs are NGK vPower Copper plugs but the NGK BKR7EIX and BKR8EIX were a good compromise between power and longevity. The OEM plugs are rated 100,000 miles by NGK, the BKR7/8EIX plugs are rated 40-60,000 miles. Since the Gen 1 Volt runs the ICE at a small number of RPM ranges and uses the traction battery to assist during hard accelerations even when "empty" the benefits of the other plugs won't be realized in the Volt. Bottom line - stick with the OEM plugs, either from ACDelco or NGK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
See the updated original post. The ACDelco plugs the previous owner put in (probably at 100k miles) were leaking and caused hell in the replacement process.
I would go with the NGK BKR7EIX and BKR8EIX
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
GM used the same Ecotec LUx 1.4 liter series engines in the 2011-2016 Limited Cruze LT, ECO, and LTZ, the Sonic LT and LTZ, and the 2010-2015 Volt. CruzeTalk.com and SonicOwnersForum.com have had a lot of discussions on the correct spark plugs as well as mappings from the NGK plug numbers to the ACDelco plug numbers. NGK makes the plugs for this engine.

In addition to changing the OEM plug number, GM Powertrain changed the plug gap from 0.035" to 0.025-0.028" for the Cruze and Sonic applications. It appears the Volt was always in the lower range (0.025 to 0.028").

And you're correct, I got the heat range impact backwards. In the Volt you want to use the higher heat range because the engine doesn't run as hard and frequently not long enough to burn off any carbon buildups.

CruzeTalk members tested several different spark plugs and what we found was that the OEM plugs are the longest lasting plugs, but from a performance standpoint they're the worst performing plugs, especially at low RPM when the turbo hadn't spooled up. The best performing plugs are NGK vPower Copper plugs but the NGK BKR7EIX and BKR8EIX were a good compromise between power and longevity. The OEM plugs are rated 100,000 miles by NGK, the BKR7/8EIX plugs are rated 40-60,000 miles. Since the Gen 1 Volt runs the ICE at a small number of RPM ranges and uses the traction battery to assist during hard accelerations even when "empty" the benefits of the other plugs won't be realized in the Volt. Bottom line - stick with the OEM plugs, either from ACDelco or NGK.
Actually I just found the comparison of the plugs BKR6/7/8EIX

https://www.audi-sport.net/xf/threads/spark-plug-temperature-comparisons-6s-7s-8s-s3-2-0t-8p2.96678/

I believe the 6 is the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,351 Posts
Actually I just found the comparison of the plugs BKR6/7/8EIX

https://www.audi-sport.net/xf/threads/spark-plug-temperature-comparisons-6s-7s-8s-s3-2-0t-8p2.96678/

I believe the 6 is the best.
Of those plugs I'd go with the NGK BKR7EIX plugs. We had a CruzeTalk member try the BKR6EIX plugs and they didn't work with the engine.

Also, when you go to pull out the ignition rail, be very, very careful. The rubber boots around the plugs tear very easily. You'll want to wiggle the ignition rail up and out. Also, before putting the ignition rail back in place, take a small screwdriver and insert it into each boot and make sure the springs are free and not bound against the side of the rubber boot. This will ensure a good contact with the spark plugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Of those plugs I'd go with the NGK BKR7EIX plugs. We had a CruzeTalk member try the BKR6EIX plugs and they didn't work with the engine.

Also, when you go to pull out the ignition rail, be very, very careful. The rubber boots around the plugs tear very easily. You'll want to wiggle the ignition rail up and out. Also, before putting the ignition rail back in place, take a small screwdriver and insert it into each boot and make sure the springs are free and not bound against the side of the rubber boot. This will ensure a good contact with the spark plugs.
The boots in my ignition coil all detached from the coil because they were glued with the plug. See the original post.
NGK has a very good description on the heat range:
http://www.ngksparkplugs.ca/tech-info-spark-plugs.cfm
6 is at higher heat range compared to 7. Therefore self cleaning better.
NGK said:"A colder heat range is necessary when the engine is modified for performance, subjected to heavy loads, or is run at high rpms for a significant period of time. The colder type removes heat more quickly, and will reduce the chance of pre-ignition/detonation and melting or damage to the firing end. "
Based on the volt having very little time in the high RPM range, and the power train is used to assist with the higher load, I don't think what happened in Cruze to your friend will ever happen on a volt.
O'Reilly, ebay and autozone recommend the 6 series as the proper heat range for volt, from what I could tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Of those plugs I'd go with the NGK BKR7EIX plugs. We had a CruzeTalk member try the BKR6EIX plugs and they didn't work with the engine.

Also, when you go to pull out the ignition rail, be very, very careful. The rubber boots around the plugs tear very easily. You'll want to wiggle the ignition rail up and out. Also, before putting the ignition rail back in place, take a small screwdriver and insert it into each boot and make sure the springs are free and not bound against the side of the rubber boot. This will ensure a good contact with the spark plugs.
Aha, I have found where your friend is talking about the heat range of ACDelco 41-122. He was wrong to equate it to the heat range of BKR7EIX.
Simply search for the volt's spark plug under O'Reilly's and you will see that the 41-122 is the same as heat range 6 for NGK:
https://www.oreillyauto.com/shop/b/...b14eb31b13d7/2014/chevrolet/volt?q=spark+plug
I have tried all other platforms, Autozone, Amazon, ebay. All claim heat range 7 NGK plugs as incompatible, when 41-122 is obviously the same as the OE NGK IFR6Z7G (which is also heat range 6).

Update, I just found the old plug (had to dumpster dive). The 41-122 is indeed the IFR6Z7G. It's inscribed on the steel shell. And with it, says Japan.
https://ibb.co/h7YGk5J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
Thanks, Wormite, for your efforts in sharing/explaining/youtubing the selection/replacing of the spark plugs. I'll probably be doing the deed in early summer after my next cross-country trip to California.

That reminds me, I need to change the transmission oil before the trip. I'll go to my local mechanic for that...having a lift makes that job much easier (at my age 8^).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thanks, Wormite, for your efforts in sharing/explaining/youtubing the selection/replacing of the spark plugs. I'll probably be doing the deed in early summer after my next cross-country trip to California.

That reminds me, I need to change the transmission oil before the trip. I'll go to my local mechanic for that...having a lift makes that job much easier (at my age 8^).
You are absolutely welcome. I'm glad that what I have learned can be useful to others. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,762 Posts
And you're correct, I got the heat range impact backwards. In the Volt you want to use the higher heat range because the engine doesn't run as hard and frequently not long enough to burn off any carbon buildups.
IMHO I think you have it backwards about how hard the engine works. When the engine does run, it's working harder than in the Cruze and spends no time idling at 500 rpm or so etc. I doubt the Volt needs a hotter plug. Another argument against the hotter plug is that GM specifies premium fuel for Gen 1 Volts. The Cruze runs on regular?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
The heat range (http://www.ngksparkplugs.ca/tech-info-spark-plugs.cfm) is to be optimized between fouling (too cold) and pre-ignition (too hot). 6 is hotter than 7. The biggest problem that the cruze people complain about is pre-ignition (too hot) at low rpm, and they all use 6(the hotter plug), so I guess 6 and 7 both won't have pre-ignition problems.
If volt as you said has no problem with low rpm. But get worked up a lot (fouling is not potential problem), we should use 7 plugs, because it gives a smoother ride and less chance of pre-ignition. 7 is what has been recommended by every website I have seen. Your conclusion seems to fit.

The whole thing is very confusing to me now....
Well, it seems that some engineer at GM thought a hotter plug was warranted for the Gen1, else why the change from 41-119 to 41-122?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,580 Posts
I'm not looking at plugs or heat ranges directly. Are you saying GM switched part numbers and the new plug is a hotter one?
Yes.

If you click on the link in my post #5, and make the appropriate selections, you will find that the recommended spark plug on this AC Delco (owned by GM) site is 41-122 (the hotter plug).
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top