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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

Vehicle info: 2013 volt with 95,000 miles and around 45,000 ICE miles.


I prematurely changed my spark plugs a few months ago using NGK BKR6EIX iridium plugs. Approximately 2000 ice miles later, just this weekend while on ICE the engine shuddered and the check engine light was blinking a few seconds then went solid once the electric drive kicked in.

I immediately pulled over. I had to get home so I ran mostly on electric but needed about 5 ice miles. Once home I checked and a P0300 misfire code was listed twice.

Today I pulled the coil pack off. I was shocked to find cylinder 1 and 2 had significant corrosion in the spark tube as well as the spark plug body (see photos) at this link please:

https://photos.app.goo.gl/EUGpAwQduGCUKTu6A


The other two spark plugs (3 & 4) and tubes looked band new and had no corrosion.



Some more relevant information:


1) The coil boots on cylinder 1&2 had some moisture in them. No fuel odor or any identifiable odor to the moisture.

2) The half burnt plugs from cyl. 1&2 indicates something is happening internally as well?

3) The coil springs of cyl. 1 2 3 were caught on the interior lip of the boot after I pulled the coil off. I don't think this has anything to do with it but I thought I would mention it. Also, coil spring from cyl 1 had a little oily gunk around the top resistor.

4) I rinsed the engine compartment gently around the same time I changed the plugs. This could explain the tube and spark body corrosion but it doesn't explain the burnt plugs and misfire (I don't think so, but please correct me).

5) My vehicles fluids haven't seemed to change in the recent past.

6) Could these NGK's BKR6EIX be the problem?

7) Cylinder two's plug had unburnt fuel on the threads when I removed it. I'm guessing this is the cylinder that misfired.



Any help would be greatly appreciated folks!

Thank you!
 

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2014 Cadillac ELR
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I use AC Delco plugs exclusively in GM cars. Spray out the plug wells with WD 40.
 

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When you removed the plugs to change them 2000 miles ago, what did the coil packs look like then? If you didn't notice any problem then (which would be obvious) what changed? I appears that moisture is getting past the seals on the tubes and getting into the area where the plugs are located. Did removing the coil packs damage the seals? How did the moisture get in there in the first place---seems like a pretty hard area for it to get to. Maybe a little silicone grease on the seals on the tubes might be in order to assure there isn't anything leaking.
 

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Pressure washing the engine bay?
 

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4) I rinsed the engine compartment gently around the same time I changed the plugs. This could explain the tube and spark body corrosion but it doesn't explain the burnt plugs and misfire (I don't think so, but please correct me).
I'm seeing a simple case of water pooled up down there and got sealed in. Corrosion and misfire ensued. Clean it up with WD 40 and dry it well and see if your misfire is gone.

Swap plugs 1&2 with 3&4 and see if your misfire follows the plug, or says with that boot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No pressure washing , just a light hose spray on the engine cover. I've rinsed it once in 5 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the help.
 

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I'd recommend anti seize on the threads and dielectric grease on the connection. The anti seize will help keep the threads clear of water, as well as allowing the plugs to come out much easier next time. The dielectric grease will increase the spark efficiency, as well as keep moisture out.

Other than that, your plugs don't look all that bad. I'd replace them with OEM plugs from Chevy. I've never had any luck trying different types of plugs, especially on newer vehicles.
 

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Right from AC Delco:



AC spark plugs should be installed dry. Do NOT use any type of anti-seize lubricant on spark plug threads. Anti-seize lubricants decrease the amount of friction between the threads, resulting in over tightening. That can cause the spark plug to move too far into the combustion chamber (in crush washer applications). Over-tightening can also distort the spark plug shell, causing a leak which would allow blowby to pass through the gasket seal between the shell and insulator. Over-tightening also results in extremely difficult removal.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was going to mention this, thanks jay.
 

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Not to disagree, but just to point out that SOME engines' designs call for anti-seize on the spark-plug threads. One notable example being a Harley-Davidson motorcycle engine. But for sure, if it isn't specifically called for by the manual, then it would be very unwise to use anti-seize.
 

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I have never put anti-seize on the plug threads, but I have always put a little silicone grease onto the upper part of the plug and inside the boot. This prevents the boot from sticking to the plug next time they're changed.
 

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I'll add my two cents on the anti-seize on spark plug threads issue ... as a rule of thumb, only use anti-seize on air cooled motors (motorcycles, old VWs etc) unless the shop manual or plug manufacturer specifically calls for it. The heads on those air cooled motors get much hotter as compared to a water cooled motor and I would not extend air cooled conventional wisdom to a water cooled motor.

Also, many spark plugs come with an antiseize coating that is designed not to interfere with the electrical function (the block acts as a ground and too much anitseize will interfere with that) so you need to make sure that you are not creating a misfire problem. In fact, virtually all spark plugs now feature a special anti-seizure nickel or zinc-chromate shell plating. In addition, the antiseize will act as a lubricant and installing to what you think is the proper torque setting will actually be too tight.

Finally as an aside, milk of magnesia is great for the threads on any bolt that will get very hot (exhaust manifold), but it will interfere with electrical function, so don't use it on spark plugs.
 
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Well Same corrison problem here Not even 8 years old Gen1 (2013 model year) and only 34,515Km - yes that low and run 99% of the time in EV mode.
The AC Delco's are quality ones (rebranded NGK made in Japan) Identical markings and item NGK IFR6Z7G x4 = $139.96 AUD
The Plugs were correctly torqued from the factory, but some how the rubber boots with tripple seals let moisture or Water? (Don't know how as there is a largecover on top to prevent this.)
I nearly wasn't going to change them so this was a surprise.
Cleaned everything and used pleanty of (ACDelco 10-4064 Dielectric Grease - 1 oz TUBE) just enough to coat the sparkplugs, the boot contacts and rubber boots and seals.
Hopefully it will prevent a re-occurance.
No codes or missfires before or after, but I'm so glad I decided to replace anyway as it was a unexpected find as to how bad some spark plugs were.
 

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