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I have a 2012 Volt that I bought new in Nov 2011, and have about 85,000 miles on it. I know that the number of miles you can drive on a charge, is a function of how you drive. When the car was new I would get 30-32 miles on a charge using a level 2 charger. Now I'm down to 20-23 miles on a charge.
My question is, can the battery be serviced? Can the battery system be diagnosed to identify faulty modules and these repaired/replaced? I know the battery system is composed of several modules as I've seen them on eBay, so is there a way of identifying if only one or two are bad vs changing out the whole battery system?
Of course cost vs number of miles gained would be a factor, but I've had this car almost 10 years and do not plan of getting rid of it any time soon!
 

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Yes Kevin. A qualified Volt tech can pin point which cells are bad or going bad. My understanding is the bad cells pull the good ones down. Just like bad friends.
I'm going through the same thing on a 2012 I just bought. Work in progress. Individual modules can be purchased apparently.
 

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In terms of when, not until a module actually goes bad or an error message is thrown. Dealer module swaps have been frequently reported here around $4k. Also keep in mind when replacing a bad used battery, with a working used battery, it isn't new. Therefore the lifespan of the replacement will be nowhere near a newly manufactured module.
 

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I can't speak directly to the Volt but I have had experience replacing individual modules in a second generation Prius.

The Prius battery utilizes 28 different modules all tied together. I envision the Volt is similar and therefore individual modules can be replaced.

As to identifying which cell to replace I used a volt meter and measured the volt on each cell. Since I didn't have specs for proper voltage ranges I determined the faulty module using relative voltage readings. My thought was the module which were notably lower in volt than the majority was likely the module needing replacement. What constituted "notably lower in voltage"? That is subjective but it was easy to identify. One of those situations where you'll know it when you see it things.

Can the dealer do this without disassembling the battery and reading the modules individually? I suspect they can. After the first repair I did on the Prius battery I was able to obtain the dealer service software and it provides the voltage readings of all the modules (well, pairs of modules) making it very easy for them to identify the troublesome pair. I would be shocked if Chevy didn't have something like that for the Volt.

Will the dealer replaces modules? Unlikely. I've been reading they replace the entire battery even though they could replace individual sections (I think there are three sections of the battery in the Volt, someone else can chime in on this). The "problem" with individual module replacement is you have a new module (assuming it's brand new) and the remaining have 85K miles on them (as in your case).

The question you have to answer is: Do you feel like going through the effort to replace a single module while having 85K on the remaining modules? For the Prius the answer was easy...we were able to pick up a module for $17 and I performed the work (approximately four hours to remove the battery, perform the battery work, and replace the battery). I wouldn't pay $4K to do it.

As to the longevity of the repair I had to perform it a second time approximately 20K miles later. This time I replaced the two weakest batteries. Unfortunately the car was sold shortly thereafter so I can't provide an update on how long the second repair "lasted" (it should be noted the two modules I replaced in the second repair were not the one I had replaced in the initial repair). The first repair was performed with approximately 165K on the clock, the second around 185K.

HTH
 

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Side note, GM's new Ultium battery platform is being promoted with cell swaps in mind, even if battery chemistry of the new cell is different. This would help future proof the main battery in case a cell goes bad. Just drop in a new cell. This mixing of battery cell chemistry can't be done on the Volt or Bolt batteries. The Ultium will start with the GMC Hummer EV, the Silverado EV, the Cadillac Lyriq, and any of the other new EV's GM has in the pipeline. The new Bolt EV and Bolt EUV will not be using Ulrium unfortunately.
 

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Side note, GM's new Ultium battery platform is being promoted with cell swaps in mind, even if battery chemistry of the new cell is different. This would help future proof the main battery in case a cell goes bad. Just drop in a new cell. This mixing of battery cell chemistry can't be done on the Volt or Bolt batteries. The Ultium will start with the GMC Hummer EV, the Silverado EV, the Cadillac Lyriq, and any of the other new EV's GM has in the pipeline. The new Bolt EV and Bolt EUV will not be using Ulrium unfortunately.
IOW avoid buying a GM EV product now.
 

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My (new to me) 2012 gets about that range, maybe 27 when it gets warmer. I used my VX-Nano to find out the HV battery has a current capacity of 34 amp/hours, compared to the 45 it had new, or 75%. My individual cells are equal under load so it seems to be healthy in that sense, just degraded with time and use.
 

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IOW avoid buying a GM EV product now.
What cars you can buy on any given day are never ever ever going to be all caught up on every announced advancement. And EVERY manufacturer is the same in that respect.
 

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What cars you can buy on any given day are never ever ever going to be all caught up on every announced advancement. And EVERY manufacturer is the same in that respect.
According to Steverino (and perhaps yourself) Ultium is supposed to be a big advancement so it would be worth waiting for would it not? Or is it not so wonderful after all?
 

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According to Steverino (and perhaps yourself) Ultium is supposed to be a big advancement so it would be worth waiting for would it not? Or is it not so wonderful after all?
All depends on how pressing it is to het another car. While Ultium has some good ideas like modularity, ability to upgrade chemistry by module and approaching million mile life, the real advancement is solid state batteries. VW and Quantumscape seem to have a lead on that with Toyota making noises, that's the big quantum (pun intended) leap. I can wait. That is an individual situational decision.
 

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I just traded in my 2016 Volt with almost 100,000 miles. It had recently been tested and battery was fine, all cells. Usually a full charge meant anywhere from 38-40 miles, depending on how I had been driving the previous week. I expected my battery to last quite a few more miles. It was not why I traded it in. I just couldn't pass up a brand new car with $16,000 off an already discounted price of $38,000 (down from original sticker of $40,000. Once they covered my trade in to completely pay off my loan, I got $14,000 off the price of the car. I also got quite a good loan from my credit union, and extra perks from Costco (which provided $3000 of my discount). Since I turned 85 yesterday and my husband no longer drives, long road trips are probably out anyway, so the 250 miles I get on the Bolt battery will be fine most of the time -- or maybe all the time. I charge it overnight at my house, and I have solar, so it's pretty inexpensive. So nice thinking I never have to get gas again! But I would say you should be able to use a Volt battery for quite a long time.
 

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I have a 2012 Volt that I bought new in Nov 2011, and have about 85,000 miles on it. I know that the number of miles you can drive on a charge, is a function of how you drive. When the car was new I would get 30-32 miles on a charge using a level 2 charger. Now I'm down to 20-23 miles on a charge.
My question is, can the battery be serviced? Can the battery system be diagnosed to identify faulty modules and these repaired/replaced? I know the battery system is composed of several modules as I've seen them on eBay, so is there a way of identifying if only one or two are bad vs changing out the whole battery system?
Of course cost vs number of miles gained would be a factor, but I've had this car almost 10 years and do not plan of getting rid of it any time soon!
was having the same problem and turned out it was the 12 volt battery located in the trunk or .Boot'.
It controls power to all the sensors, modules and internal CPU's. I am back up to 29 to 30 on my battery life.
 

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I too have a 2012 with around 80,000 miles and first thing I noticed was a loss of range, then the regular Propulsion Power Reduced messages came up (even with the recall software update). My best range before the CEL and the car going into limp mode was in the teens, now it’s 41.1 miles mixed highway and country roads. So if the car didn’t brick itself I wouldn’t notice how much range I was losing, but post battery replacement (all cells) I have more than doubled my range.
 

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I bought the car used last August, so I didn’t know how much degradation it had. When I got it the GOM was showing around 29 miles of range. That went down to 24, then 19, and stayed in the teens until the car bricked itself.

My best guess is the previous owner noticed this and traded it in, leaving me with a battery that was near end of life.

The new battery just did 44.3 miles in mixed country roads (speed limit 45-55mph) and I was not going excessively fast or slow to achieve this. At 55mph my range is always in the 40’s with the new battery.

172299
 

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I bought the car used last August, so I didn’t know how much degradation it had. When I got it the GOM was showing around 29 miles of range. That went down to 24, then 19, and stayed in the teens until the car bricked itself.

My best guess is the previous owner noticed this and traded it in, leaving me with a battery that was near end of life.

The new battery just did 44.3 miles in mixed country roads (speed limit 45-55mph) and I was not going excessively fast or slow to achieve this. At 55mph my range is always in the 40’s with the new battery.

View attachment 172299
wonderful. After getting the upgraded software I was getting about the same as without it, 32 to 34 miles.
The bad cell in the 12 volt battery in the trunk it went to almost all gas power. Replacing the 12 volt I now get 29 to 30 constant on battery.
 
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