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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Gen 1 owner here. Car is a 2012, with about 150,000 miles on it.

How does this seem for full charge battery life? Outside temperature about 35F, damp roads, heat in "ECO" + heated seats on the entire time.

I was under the impression these have 10.5KWH usable new - is this a normal amount of degradation considering it's 10 years old w/ 150k miles?

Lifetime MPG of the car is only 40-ish so I'm not sure how much it ever got plugged in. It actually ended up going about 50-51KM on battery before switching to gas, despite the meter showing here that it's already on gas mode, the engine had not actually started yet.

side note, overall I love this car so far! Wish it had a bit more power, but once I figure out how to put an ELR tune on it or get into HPtuners, I'll fix that. And a little more range would be nice, but, it's enough.


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I am a relatively new Volt owner as well (2011 with ~63k miles currently). Mine does not report the Kw-h used like a 2012 will do, so I am not sure if that data point is strictly reporting the energy used for motivation of the vehicle, or if it includes battery heating and HVAC heating as well. When I first bought my Volt in June 2021, I did some test drives to see how far I could go under almost ideal conditions (70-ish F ambient, no HVAC, windows up, conservative lower speed driving, minimizing braking, etc...). Using the MyGreenVolt app I monitored the kW-h delivered from the battery. I was able to use ~10.2kW-h from full charge to just as the icon switched over to ICE (but before the engine fired). I traveled ~56 miles. But that was under ideal conditions and likely included ~800' of overall elevation drop.

Under more routine conditions, still during warm weather, I have observed about 40 miles of range. However, during cooler weather (20-30F), I am seeing closer to 30 miles of range. I have not observed the kW-h of energy delivery on the app (plus I do not know if the MGV app and the dash display are reporting the same number since I do not have the dash display). What I have noticed is that the cabin heating (in ECO) as well as the battery heating consume quite a bit of power, and will shorten your range.

Bottom line - I think 50 km (30 miles) of range is likely pretty normal in cooler weather. There are strategies that you can employ (use less heat, keep tires well inflated, drive slower, coast to a stop, brake less, keep car warm in garage, charge just prior to departure to pre-warm battery, use cabin pre-conditioning and allow to recharge before departure) to get as much range as possible, but the improvements will be fairly small.
 

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How many miles to you get from a full battery?

Keep in mind, tire pressure, driving style, use of AC/heat/defroster, speed, outside temps, hills, etc. all affect range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, in that case - 50KM which is about 31 miles.

I have yet to drive the car in warm weather, so I'm not sure what that will translate to with the heat off.
 

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Getting 9.6kwh in that kind of weather is pretty normal, I'd say that battery is probably in good health. Even if it were degraded part of the beauty of the volt is that it's not as big a deal to lose electric range as it is in a pure electric. I wouldn't worry about it.
I have a '15 (which has a slightly larger battery) with 90k miles and I usually get 34 - 36 miles in that kind of weather.
 

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Well, in that case - 50KM which is about 31 miles.

I have yet to drive the car in warm weather, so I'm not sure what that will translate to with the heat off.
My 2011 gets about 31-38 miles, so I'd say your 2012 is normal.
 

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Those figures translate to about 3.2 miles per KW which is very comparable to the current numbers my 2013 is getting in the current MN chill with ECO heat and seat warmer turned on. Mine has only 38,000 miles on it - I usually expect a bit over 3 miles per KW in the cold, 4.25+ in summer with 10.6 - 10.7 usage at ICE start.

Your 9.6KW total usage is impressive for a 2012 with 150K on it. With those numbers it would seem that the car is performing well. Hope my 2013 does as well at 150K!
 

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Not too bad with 150,000 miles (not Km). My 2013 with 63,000+ miles was around 60 Km. for 10.3 Kwh going 94 kph. (speed limit 90 kph). with stop lights every couple of miles (whether I caught them or not). I did get another 6 km. one time using A/C on ECO going a little slower and passing about 6 fewer cars which shows you how little juice it uses. This was two years ago so don't get to those ICE switching distances since but battery seems to be about the same as near as I can tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Awesome, thanks for the replies guys.

It looks like my "real world" average MPG is going to be better than my old car, even if this gets substantially worse MPG on fuel, I'll be using it on battery most of the time.
My commute is pretty short (10 miles, and I can charge on both ends) so when it's cold out I just crank the heat and don't really care about the range. But it's good to know that my battery seems healthy. With the miles the car had, and the brief trouble the battery gave me during my test drive (went from 17 miles range to 0 in about 1 mile total, and gave me the "limited power" warning on the dash, I had some initial concerns about it. But after a few drain/charge cycles it seems happy and healthy.
 

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When I was shopping for my Volt I ran across one that had a lifetime average mileage of around 39 which I thought was strange for an electric car. The salesman said it came from a Gov employee and that many were issued the car as a green program. He said many folks in the program never charged their cars because they got reimbursed for their gas receipts but not for their electric bill. Some also lived where they did not have a place to charge. Gotta love bureaucracy in action..."I'm from the government and I'm here to help".

That car should go for many good battery miles if the cells seem balanced currently. The car has only been using the pack as a regulator for the varied demands. Your car will be the test to see how long the engines last. Considering how many miles most get out of newer model cars, there is likely a lot of life left in the engine. Sparkie got over 400k and most of those were on the engine.

My 14 with 109 now gets between 9.8kWh and 10.4kWh (I think long trips with downhill stretches it). Cold weather here in the Midwest has dropped my city electric driving to the 30-32 range. I do use the heater. It was averaging 40-42 before the temp dropped. The life time average on mine is about 73 so I think that would be around 40% of the miles on the engine.
 

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When I was shopping for my Volt I ran across one that had a lifetime average mileage of around 39 which I thought was strange for an electric car. The salesman said it came from a Gov employee and that many were issued the car as a green program. He said many folks in the program never charged their cars because they got reimbursed for their gas receipts but not for their electric bill. Some also lived where they did not have a place to charge. Gotta love bureaucracy in action..."I'm from the government and I'm here to help".

That car should go for many good battery miles if the cells seem balanced currently. The car has only been using the pack as a regulator for the varied demands. Your car will be the test to see how long the engines last. Considering how many miles most get out of newer model cars, there is likely a lot of life left in the engine. Sparkie got over 400k and most of those were on the engine.

My 14 with 109 now gets between 9.8kWh and 10.4kWh (I think long trips with downhill stretches it). Cold weather here in the Midwest has dropped my city electric driving to the 30-32 range. I do use the heater. It was averaging 40-42 before the temp dropped. The life time average on mine is about 73 so I think that would be around 40% of the miles on the engine.
The Gen 1 Volt with a Lifetime MPG of 39 spent a LOT of its time using gas-generated electricity as fuel, so those who drove those cars were still "driving an electric car." The Gen 1's "gas mileage" is actually the distance you can drive during the time it takes the generator to burn one gallon of gas.

Sparkie is a 2012 Volt whose larger motor MGB propelled the car 100% of the time. ALL of those 400,000+ miles were driven using the larger electric motor MGB as the primary source of propulsion.

The Gen 1 Volt’s larger motor is capable of providing full performance, which makes it possible to extend the range of the Gen 1 Volt as an all-electric car. The only physical connection between the Gen 1's gas engine and the extended range propulsion system is the clutch that connects it to the smaller motor MGA. The ICE cranks MGA as a generator, and the generator output fuels the electric motor MGB to propel the car (with supplemental power provided from the extended range battery buffer when needed). When the Gen 1 Volt is smoothly cruising down the road, performance is not paramount, so the system will clutch the ICE/MGA combo to the drivetrain at speeds of 35 mph and above. This configuration improves MGB’s efficiency by lower the rpm, smooths out the engine on/off cycles, and the ICE-clutched-to-MGA-clutched-to-the-ring gear configuration allows engine torque to contribute to propulsion torque. Some consider this as a direct connection between the ICE and the wheels; I prefer "engine-assisted electric propulsion." If a performance demand is made (e.g., floor the accelerator to pass someone), the system switches back to one-motor configuration to meet the performance request.

When extending the range, the Gen 1 Volt ICE in split-power configuration may help propel the vehicle at suburban street speeds as well as at highway speeds, but the Gen 1 Volt is not engineered to use the ICE as the primary or only source of propulsion.

By the by, if you divide your odometer reading (in miles) by the Lifetime MPG number, you should get the Lifetime Gas consumption in gallons for your car... and that number of gallons is also the number of miles you must drive on battery power only without using any gas to increase the Lifetime MPG by 1.0000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The lifetime MPG on this car works out to 39.7 as well.

Kinda awful considering it's lifetime with me so far is 125 MPG, and I expect that to climb to probably 150-160 over time.

This car is replacing my G1 honda insight, which, with 285,000 miles on it has a lifetime mpg of 73.4
 

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I see similar kWh used totals on a charge in my 2014 with 144,000 miles (lifetime mpg of 115). I have only owned it a few months but everything is good so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
New record! Worst range, and most KWH! Wasn't even super cold out. My commute length is 31KM, I drove a little extra to see just how many KWH I could pull out of the battery. It seems like the more the car gets used the better the battery gets, not surprising considering it sat for 8 months before I got it 2 weeks ago.







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