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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
No problem but my post was to seek help, not have folks create more clutter to it :(

Go to any shop and tell them you have a leak in the AC system, and they would NEVER say that you may have a leak in your "radiator".
 

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No problem but my post was to seek help, not have folks create more clutter to it :(..
Wow, that was so true.:rolleyes:
"I have ordered a new one and getting my mechanic to replace it."

This is how I would handle it! Keep us posted what the final repair costs are.

Side note: I had the 'VoltScreen' on my Volt. That is one 'non-clutter' response that is useful!
I should install some screen on my Spark EV, before I wish I had.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
All done! Disconnected main breaker and 12V battery. We removed the bumper, front battery radiator & various hoses and replaced the AC Condenser. Refilled about 30oz of freon and topped off Dexcool in the 2 front reservoirs and everything seems back to normal. No major electrical plugs to disconnect, NO codes. Saved on $ also :)


IMG_5345.jpg IMG_5346.jpg View attachment 154827 IMG_5349.jpg IMG_5350.jpg
 

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All done! Disconnected main breaker and 12V battery. We removed the bumper, front battery radiator & various hoses and replaced the AC Condenser. Refilled about 30oz of freon and topped off Dexcool in the 2 front reservoirs and everything seems back to normal. No major electrical plugs to disconnect, NO codes. Saved on $ also :)
Nicely done! Did you replace the filter/dryer as well? I was always told that was necessary whenever the sealed system was opened up. Also, did you pull a vacuum before recharging?
 

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Nicely done! Did you replace the filter/dryer as well? I was always told that was necessary whenever the sealed system was opened up.
It's inside the condenser and should come with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Yup, a new Desiccant container/bag comes attached to the new condenser, no oil needed. We vacuumed last night and left the gauge attached to see if we had any leaks, 20 hours later (6 pm this evening) and the gauge read the same. We put everything back today.
 

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@Houston Volt

Im not sure if its been mentioned yet but there is something very important that needs to be kept in mind when it comes to the Volt AC system. It is CRUCIAL that PAG oil NOT be used. Only POE oil can be used. It is also CRUCIAL that the charging hoses not be contaminated with PAG oil. It does not take much to cause an isolation failure. This is to maintain electrical isolation inside the compressor. Almost all auto AC systems PAG oil. The Volt uses POE oil because its nonconductive.

From page 3678 of the Volt service manual thats been floating around:

Danger: This A/C system's high voltage A/C Compressor uses Polyolester (POE) refrigerant oil. Use of any refrigerant oil other than POE may result in compressor failure
and/or loss of high voltage isolation which may result in serious danger or death. For applicable equipment please refer to TIS Newsletter/repair equipment information.
Warning: To prevent personal injury, avoid breathing A/C Refrigerant and lubricant vapour or mist. Work in a well ventilated area. To remove refrigerant from the A/C System,
use service equipment designed for recovery that is certified to meet the requirements of the appropriate SAE Standards. If an accidental system discharge occurs, ventilate
the work area before continuing service. Additional health and safety information may be obtained from the refrigerant, refrigerant recovery, and lubricant manufacturers.
Warning: For personal protection, goggles and lint-free gloves should be worn and a clean lint free cloth wrapped around fittings, valves, and connections when doing work
that includes opening the refrigerant system. If refrigerant comes in contact with any part of the body severe frostbite and personal injury can result. The exposed area should
be flushed immediately with cold water and prompt medical help should be obtained.
Caution: This A/C refrigerant system is equipped with a High Voltage electric A/C compressor and you must replace the desiccant if the A/C refrigerant system has been open
to atmosphere for more than thirty minutes, or if the A/C refrigerant oil has been contaminated. Failure to replace the desiccant will result in damage to the A/C refrigerant
system.
Caution: R-134a is the only approved refrigerant for use in this vehicle. The use of any other refrigerant may result in poor system performance or component failure and
potentially void the vehicle warranty for the refrigerant system.
Caution: Do not lubricate A/C line seal washers as mineral oil will damage the seal and cause leaks. Use only 525 viscosity mineral oil to lubricate o-rings as well as fitting
threads for the prevention of fitting seizure.
Caution: Failure to flush the refrigerant recovery recharge equipment hoses before adding refrigerant to a hybrid vehicle with an electric compressor may result in an
unacceptable amount of Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG) oil entering the refrigerant system. This could result in reduced electrical resistance of the Polyolester (POE) oil and
reduce its ability to provide the required level of high voltage isolation.
 

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Yup, a new Desiccant container/bag comes attached to the new condenser, no oil needed. We vacuumed last night and left the gauge attached to see if we had any leaks, 20 hours later (6 pm this evening) and the gauge read the same. We put everything back today.
Every component that gets replaced holds a quantity of oil. Service manuals usually call out how much oil to add during replacement.

I'd look it up and add the oil before you damage the compressor. There are tools to inject the oil to a charged system.
 
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