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howdy,

I have a 2011 Volt. I understand that 2011 models (but not 2012 or newer) can use this decreasing air pressure technique after a tire rotation to inform the car of the new position of each tire.

my question: Does this technique only work when the same four TPMS sensors that the car knows about are rotated, or will it work if one or more new TPMS sensors are introduced?

I have swapped a wheel (along with its tire) with one from a separate 2011 Volt, and I'm wondering if I need to purchase a TPMS relearn tool (or use someone else's in the DC/NoVa area) to make the dashboard happy again.
 

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It will relearn with the new one, as long as only four are within range of the car.
 

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I just swapped out a tire ( I have a spare wheel, tire with tpms sender) it fairly easy. Start the car, bring up the tire pressure screen, hold the select button until the learn question comes up. Confirm learn, then start letting air out of LF until hear beep, then go to RF, RR then LR. It can take awhile to get the 8 pounds out of the tire just pushing the valve stem. Be patient. Once all 4 are confirmed air em back up restart the car and your good to go.
 

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My understanding is it's just programming of the car computer, not special hardware.
It gets signal from a sensor, if that value drops x amount when instructed to remove air, then it knows that's the tire.
Because unless a car parked nearby at that exact moment also deflates a tire, chances are that's the tire you are working on.

I guess this chance was more likely initially thought, so they went to the tool triggered method. (or for conspiracy fans - a way to make extra service $)

I can see proximity to other cars being an issue in a tire shop, so you'd have to ensure you're not doing multiple cars at the same time. Probably why they moved away from it.
 

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Actually, the multiple horn honks could be very obnoxious especially in a service center environment. I'm assuming that when you use the tpms programming tool it does the job in silence?
 

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Actually, the multiple horn honks could be very obnoxious especially in a service center environment. I'm assuming that when you use the tpms programming tool it does the job in silence?
It's really not that loud. When Discount Tire rotates ours, it's after they've brought it out of the bay and just before handing me the keys. Takes about 20 seconds.
 

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Actually, the multiple horn honks could be very obnoxious especially in a service center environment. I'm assuming that when you use the tpms programming tool it does the job in silence?
I don't think so, I could hear honks while I was in the waiting room - quite loudly in short succession that it was likely TPMS. Unless the vehicle I heard was an older one.
I've yet to relearn my own (though I do have the tool) so can't comment on the sound from personal experience.
 
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