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I would opinions on the idea not the product/source. But from other threads this source is providing such a adapter.
So does anyone see an issue with using such an adatpter considering the volt will decide how much it will draw max even though the source power is higher than it needs. Just checking before deciding to maybe buy one. A resort I will be heading to sometime later this year has the 14-50 (4 prong with 3 flat blades) format while of course the plug end on my clipper creek has the standard newer 4 prong 14-30 (4 prong wotj 1 of the 3 blades being L shaped).
Per my request this is what it might look like. This would allow me to carry my 240v charger with me to destinations that offer that 14-50 format to plug into.
https://bsa-electronics.myshopify.com/products/adapter-11-14-50-plug-to-14-30r-box-outlet-adapter-3-5ft
 

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I would opinions on the idea not the product/source. But from other threads this source is providing such a adapter.
So does anyone see an issue with using such an adatpter considering the volt will decide how much it will draw max even though the source power is higher than it needs. Just checking before deciding to maybe buy one. A resort I will be heading to sometime later this year has the 14-50 (4 prong with 3 flat blades) format while of course the plug end on my clipper creek has the standard newer 4 prong 14-30 (4 prong wotj 1 of the 3 blades being L shaped).
Per my request this is what it might look like. This would allow me to carry my 240v charger with me to destinations that offer that 14-50 format to plug into.
https://bsa-electronics.myshopify.com/products/adapter-11-14-50-plug-to-14-30r-box-outlet-adapter-3-5ft
An adaptor that plugs into a 50 amp receptacle and provides its own receptacle in a 30 amp pin arrangement is perfectly fine. The device with the 30-amp plug will/should never draw more than 30 amps and all is fine with the world.
 

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If the clipper creek EVSE has built in 30A fuses then you will be fine. However if the unit is not fused you might want to consider putting 30A fuses into your adaptor (if they are not in there already).

As you stated already the Volt will not draw more than 15A so current carrying capacity will be fine.
 

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Do you think twice about plugging your 0.05A USB cell phone charger into an outlet capable of 300x that amount? (15A)

The danger (to the facility) is when you plug a 50A device into a 30A outlet and it actually draws more than 30A. Can overload the wires, and if breaker fails to trip, heat up and cause a fire.

There is a third option - remove the neutral pin from your EVSE plug. It can then be plugged into 14-50 or 14-30 freely.
 

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Should be fine. I know some EV owners use an adapter like this all the time since 14-50 is common at RV parks. In a perfect world the fuses would match the EVSE but we don't live in a perfect world. I wouldn't follow the suggestion for removing the neutral prong from the EVSE but that would work. EVSE Upgrade sells a universal adapter from 14-30, 14-50, and 14-60 outlets to EVSE with L6-30 plugs, and it does this by removing the neutral.
 

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I wouldn't follow the suggestion for removing the neutral prong from the EVSE but that would work.
Why not? Simply because it's not the 'official' plug anymore?
The Neutral on the EVSE is connected to nothing. Only H-H-G are connected to anything.
Whether that pin is there or not does not change the electrical connections.

It's not like people breaking ground pins off of standard 15A plugs - that's a big no-no as it actually is there and being used for something.
 

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This has been common practice since the beginning of the EV era. I created my universal adapters a few years ago when the LEAF came home. Still carry them today, use them anytime the VOLT needs an opportunity charge.

Source discussion: http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=1450&start=18

I made the Nema 10 and 14 adapters to fit both of my portable EVSE's
 

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Do you think twice about plugging your 0.05A USB cell phone charger into an outlet capable of 300x that amount?

Your cell phone charger is designed and safety tested to plug into a 20 amp socket and has either a fuse or a fusable resistor built in at the ac input to protect the internal wires, traces, and components from starting a fire under a worst case failure condition.

An electrical device with a 30 amp plug may not be safety rated to plug into a circuit fused at 50 amps. There might be an increased chance of the device igniting on fire under worst case failure conditions.
 

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An electrical device with a 30 amp plug may not be safety rated to plug into a circuit fused at 50 amps. There might be an increased chance of the device igniting on fire under worst case failure conditions.
This premise is totally wrong. Toasters, hair driers, Christmas trees, lights etc may or may not have on-board overload protection. The circuit breaker is designed to protect the house wiring and outlets. The breaker doesn't care if your device can't protect itself.
 

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Why not? Simply because it's not the 'official' plug anymore?
The Neutral on the EVSE is connected to nothing. Only H-H-G are connected to anything.
Whether that pin is there or not does not change the electrical connections.
Yeah, I know. I said it would work. I just wouldn't do it, probably because I'd wonder if at some point down the car might use 120v as well as 240v.
 

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Your cell phone charger is designed and safety tested to plug into a 20 amp socket and has either a fuse or a fusable resistor built in at the ac input to protect the internal wires, traces, and components from starting a fire under a worst case failure condition.

An electrical device with a 30 amp plug may not be safety rated to plug into a circuit fused at 50 amps. There might be an increased chance of the device igniting on fire under worst case failure conditions.
A $500-5000 safety switch device is not internally fused to it's safe limit, but a $1 USB transformer is? I find that a bit of a stretch.

This premise is totally wrong. Toasters, hair driers, Christmas trees, lights etc may or may not have on-board overload protection. The circuit breaker is designed to protect the house wiring and outlets. The breaker doesn't care if your device can't protect itself.
OP acknowledged that the EVSE/volt will only draw as much power as it needs. Thus there is no danger on either end of using such an adapter, same as there is no danger in plugging in a 0.05A device into a 15A outlet, for either overload of the device or the circuit. Which is what I was trying to get across.

If the device fails and draws more power than it should, it's going to sizzle or blow an internal fuse. This is true for anything plugged into any circuit that does not match it's load exactly 100%. And you do this every day with devices that are far less smart than an EVSE.
On the flip side, if the overcurrent protection of the wiring circuit fails, your 30A EVSE cannot draw more than the circuit allows, thus also not a problem.
I don't understand why this even needed more comment.
 

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A $500-5000 safety switch device is not internally fused to it's safe limit, but a $1 USB transformer is? I find that a bit of a stretch.
Actually that is often the case. Because a 0.05A device might incorporate a 0.2A fuse which is very inexpensive. But a 30A over circuit protection is more costly. Note over circuit protection is a device like a fuse or circuit breaker.

For appliances everything is rated based on the circuit protection its expected to be hooked up to. Example, internal solder traces are sized based on over circuit protection. Components are rated based on maximum fault current.

I work with testing and certification of appliances with and without ground fault protection. First question a certification engineer will ask (from organisations like CSA and UL). What is your recommended maximum rated current and over circuit protection and give me a list of components and their certified component ratings (and they verify). These individual components all have fault current ratings based on a maximum over circuit protection.

When it comes to ground fault protection it gets more complicated because even a certified component is not enough as there are additional requirements for GFI. Example Relays have to continue to function without welding the contacts even after a fault current event. This testing is also based off a maximum possible fault current based off the manufacturers maximum stated over circuit protection.

Circuit breakers are very slow safety devices. If the breaker is oversized it could take an incredibly long time to trip or not trip at all under a fault condition. If you hook up a device designed for a 30A circuit to a 50A breaker and a fault happens and it draws 30 to 50A that breaker will not trip and your device will just keep on burning. Even if it draws 55A that breaker could take up to 8 hours to trip. Heat generated is current squared times the resistance. So a wire designed to run 24A continuous will put out four times its designed heat at 50A.

Engineers don't intentionally oversize components beyond the existing safety ratings (this adds cost). If a device is expected to draw less than 16A then I design all the components to function properly based on a 20A over circuit protection.
 
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