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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any issues with replacing a 3 way switch setup with 15A outlets to use for L1 charging? In my garage I have an existing 3 way switches to control the interior light from the front overhead door and a rear access door. I would like to leave this always hot as the garage door is plugged into the light socket extension. I also would like to add a GFCI to the circuit as added protection. Thanks for the technical help.
 

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Switching lights on and off or using the garage door could cause a lot of line noise, which will make the EVSE just flat out stop charging. That EVSE is going to chew up 12 out of 15A already, so I wouldn't risk it. Also, the EVSE has built in GFCI, so there's not really any need to put a second one in circuit. When I was running mine on L1, I installed a Leviton outlet that had built-in surge protection. What year is your Volt?
 

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For what it's worth, my garage has a GFCI outlet (and the EVSE has one also) yet when I accidentally overloaded the circuit by running a shop vac while my car was plugged in, it tripped the breaker not the ground fault protection.
 

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You should install or find a dedicated (20 amp) circuit to use for charging.

A lighting circuit is not designed or intended for high current applications. What you described sounds like a fire risk.
 

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For what it's worth, my garage has a GFCI outlet (and the EVSE has one also) yet when I accidentally overloaded the circuit by running a shop vac while my car was plugged in, it tripped the breaker not the ground fault protection.
Because ground fault protection is to protect against ground faults, not overloads.

OP. since you had to ask, get an electrician.
 

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Another vote for going for a dedicated line... with lights and a garage door opener on the circuit, just not a good idea to throw a solid 12A on top of whatever you are already using.

At that point if you are going to run a dedicated circuit, might as well make it 240V Level 2 (Gen2 EVSS's support this out of the box)


The only way I'd feel safe running it as wired now is if you left it in 8Amp charge mode, which means charging will be super slow.
 

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From the description it seems that there are serious electrical shortcuts in this garage already.

- Nothing else should be on the lighting circuit especially a garage door opener. If the breaker trips it will not only stop working, you will be in the dark.
- An EVSE needs it's own dedicated 20-amp (minimum) circuit.

So a couple things need to happen:
1. Hire an electrician.
2. Electrician to assess the work needed.
3. Work to include a dedicated circuit for the EVSE.
4. Work to include a circuit for the garage door opener.
5. Work to include a circuit or circuits for general use.
6. Lighting assessment for safety and adequate lumens.
7. All work complies with local permitting and standards.
8. Home owner work is limited to writing the check.
 

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- An EVSE needs it's own dedicated 20-amp (minimum) circuit.

So a couple things need to happen:
1. Hire an electrician.
2. Electrician to assess the work needed.
3. Work to include a dedicated circuit for the EVSE.
4. Work to include a circuit for the garage door opener.
5. Work to include a circuit or circuits for general use.
6. Lighting assessment for safety and adequate lumens.
7. All work complies with local permitting and standards.
8. Home owner work is limited to writing the check.<<<< Ha Ha, Funny, but very true !
And while your having this work done by a professional, it's the perfect time to step up your EV Game and have a 30 A - 240V outlet installed. This will future proof your house and add value to it.

This will not be your last EV, trust me !!!!
 

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From the description it seems that there are serious electrical shortcuts in this garage already.

- Nothing else should be on the lighting circuit especially a garage door opener. If the breaker trips it will not only stop working, you will be in the dark.
- An EVSE needs it's own dedicated 20-amp (minimum) circuit.

So a couple things need to happen:
1. Hire an electrician.
2. Electrician to assess the work needed.
3. Work to include a dedicated circuit for the EVSE.
4. Work to include a circuit for the garage door opener.
5. Work to include a circuit or circuits for general use.
6. Lighting assessment for safety and adequate lumens.
7. All work complies with local permitting and standards.
8. Home owner work is limited to writing the check.
And filling out forms for any state and federal EVSE rebates/tax credits.
 

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And while your having this work done by a professional, it's the perfect time to step up your EV Game and have a 30 A - 240V outlet installed. This will future proof your house and add value to it.

This will not be your last EV, trust me !!!!
I'm on my third Volt. I'd love a Tesla but want to retire and can't fit one into my budget. Upgrade to a Level II EVSE and be happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So I should just make a guess and install it myself. Ha!

Thank you for all the replies and sound advice. I'll look at an overhaul and upgrade by a pro.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Switching lights on and off or using the garage door could cause a lot of line noise, which will make the EVSE just flat out stop charging. That EVSE is going to chew up 12 out of 15A already, so I wouldn't risk it. Also, the EVSE has built in GFCI, so there's not really any need to put a second one in circuit. When I was running mine on L1, I installed a Leviton outlet that had built-in surge protection. What year is your Volt?
I have a 2014. Future proofing makes sense too.
 

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For what it's worth, my garage has a GFCI outlet (and the EVSE has one also) yet when I accidentally overloaded the circuit by running a shop vac while my car was plugged in, it tripped the breaker not the ground fault protection.
In my book, overloading a circuit by drawing more amperes than what a circuit is designed to carry shouldn't cause a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter to trip. A GFCI monitors for unwanted current flow between either conductor and ground, indicating an unintended current flow such as through your body or water, and trips in milliseconds. Your circuit breaker, though, is designed to trip when overloaded for a few seconds, to protect the wiring from overheating.
 
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