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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I drive a lot. Somewhere between 35,000 and 40,000 miles a year.

My commute is roughly 155 miles a day, 5 days a week. I just crossed the 29,000 mile mark after purchasing the car with 19K on the ODO back on Oct. 5th.

So far, it's been a worry free 3 months. I replaced the battery in the remote, but I bought a cheap Dollar Tree battery (mistake). I wasn't getting a "remote battery" message, but the car many times would not start after I got in. It would just tell me to use the key slot to start the car.

After buying a Duracell, that issue has disappeared.

I'm pretty happy with the winter fuel economy (38-42 MPG), even with the snow tires and cold temps keeping the MPG lower.

My electric bill had an increase of 35 dollars on the 1st bill I got in November, and should be roughly the same this month. I pay about .12 cents per KWH here in Milwaukee, although it is slightly cheaper after 7pm, when I charge the car.

I installed a Volt Shield, which was no doubt a smart decision on my part and the 3M Clear Bra I bought and installed has held up and seems to be doing it's job.

I'm happy to say the car has started a few conversations at the gas station and since my plate renewal was up, I decided to go with a Personalized plate....... "LOWBATT"

So, here's to many more months/years of trouble free ownership!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Just hit 33,000 miles this morning and I finally experienced the engine running due to outside temperature since the OAT was 1 degree when I got in the car.... Too cold.
 

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Glad it is working out for you. I would think in your situation (commuting beyond electric range), the ERDTT would be good for overall efficiency. You might consider setting it to the warmer temperature. What is your overall MPG for that commute?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What is your overall MPG for that commute?
For the commute, I'm averaging anywhere from 35-41 MPG depending on the temperature. This morning with such cold temps, I averaged 34 mpg on my way to work so we'll see what it does this afternoon on my way home. Including the battery miles, I'm currently averaging just above 40 MPG per tank, but that will obviously increase as the temps get back up to comfortable levels. My experience with the Volt thus far has taught me that this car is not the best choice of car for cold temperatures... Surprise surprise!
 

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Remember that cold temperatures affect regular gas cars also, most people just don't realize (or calculate) it.

Ironically enough I've been considering buying a house much farther away, as buying anything with the amount of land I want in my area (2 acres or more) is astronomical. It would shift my work commute from 52 miles a day, to 210, with about an 1hr and 40 min drive each way. It would be a big sacrifice to get the home we want, and a used Model S would likely make sense then.

I'm glad the Gen1 is working out for you. I loved mine when I had it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is 35-41 MPG just for when you are burning gasoline, or is that the overall average including when you are using the battery?
That's calculating the actual commute with gas only. I bought the car in October, so I only had a few weeks of decent weather to see what it would do when nice out, and I was easily above 50 mpg on my commute. As the temps dropped, so goes the mpg.......... When I refuel, the average I compute is for gas and battery, and I'm still around 41-42 mpg.

Now, this morning, I drove in 6 degree weather and couldn't get past 33 MPG for the 75 mile drive.
 

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That's calculating the actual commute with gas only. I bought the car in October, so I only had a few weeks of decent weather to see what it would do when nice out, and I was easily above 50 mpg on my commute. As the temps dropped, so goes the mpg.......... When I refuel, the average I compute is for gas and battery, and I'm still around 41-42 mpg.

Now, this morning, I drove in 6 degree weather and couldn't get past 33 MPG for the 75 mile drive.
Just curious, on your 75 mile drive what was your average highway speed? Did you use cruise or ACC?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just curious, on your 75 mile drive what was your average highway speed? Did you use cruise or ACC?
No ACC on my car... I do use cruise control and usually set it between 63-66 mph. That seems to be the sweet spot I've found for the most efficient drive. I hate to use more fuel than I need to, so I just hang in the right lane and bide my time...
 

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No ACC on my car... I do use cruise control and usually set it between 63-66 mph. That seems to be the sweet spot I've found for the most efficient drive. I hate to use more fuel than I need to, so I just hang in the right lane and bide my time...
Although I don't drive long distances when I do use gas I try and ensure that the ICE fully warms. I regularly see 45 - 50 MPG in my 2017 Volt, lifetime average is 43 MPG. I am sure my Volt's MPG would be lower in 6F temperatures.
 

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.... cruise control and usually set it between 63-66 mph. That seems to be the sweet spot I've found for the most efficient drive. ....
Nope. Try 45 MPH for a more efficient MPG, (if that is all you're after).
Then after that try 35 MPH!
 

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No ACC on my car... I do use cruise control and usually set it between 63-66 mph. That seems to be the sweet spot I've found for the most efficient drive. I hate to use more fuel than I need to, so I just hang in the right lane and bide my time...
An ICE car has a sweet spot where there is a certain rpm that is most efficient that is determined by valve timing, valve lift, exhaust manifold, backpressure etc. which translates into sweet spot in a mph range for better mileage (range). EV drive isn't like that. Electric motor is more efficient a low rpm and decreases as rpm rise, which is why both motors engage so the planetary gear can result in lower rpm when it gets too high. With a 1 speed transmission (in which the planetary gears are exempted) the faster you go the more air resistance (mostly) plus some tire and friction resistance the less range you will get which only gets offset a little by the lowering of rpm of the two motors engaging (remember they are now both using energy). The result of that is there is no "sweet spot", just a balance between "taking longer to get there" vs. longer range (cheaper travel).
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
An ICE car has a sweet spot where there is a certain rpm that is most efficient that is determined by valve timing, valve lift, exhaust manifold, backpressure etc. which translates into sweet spot in a mph range for better mileage (range). EV drive isn't like that. Electric motor is more efficient a low rpm and decreases as rpm rise, which is why both motors engage so the planetary gear can result in lower rpm when it gets too high. With a 1 speed transmission (in which the planetary gears are exempted) the faster you go the more air resistance (mostly) plus some tire and friction resistance the less range you will get which only gets offset a little by the lowering of rpm of the two motors engaging (remember they are now both using energy). The result of that is there is no "sweet spot", just a balance between "taking longer to get there" vs. longer range (cheaper travel).
Technically, you are correct F1... I'm just going off my experience over the last 4 months and 11,000 miles..
 

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I've unfortunately had to drive my Volt more than anticipated this winter, due to the winter beater I bought to take over duty deciding to flat line a week before the coldest temps of the year.

My commute is only 8 miles, however it's 100% city streets both ways. I've had pretty much non-stop ERDTT for a week now due to the temp, which I actually don't mind. ERDTT runs the gas engine JUST enough to keep battery and cabin temps up. It's akin to a "high idle". Constant RPM, fairly steady load, pretty much a gas engine's sweet spot. Even with the crazy cold I'm still seeing ~43 mpg, something I'm quite sure not even a Prius would touch in this environment.

The other bonus of ERDTT? CABIN HEAT! It may just be me, being all of 5'10 and slender, but I get cold. The 6kW electric heater is great, down to about 25 degrees give or take. Lower than that, and you just need internal combustion given the design constraints. I've even found myself switching to "Hold" mode to get the engine revving for extra heat when ERDTT mode doesn't satisfy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've unfortunately had to drive my Volt more than anticipated this winter, due to the winter beater I bought to take over duty deciding to flat line a week before the coldest temps of the year.

My commute is only 8 miles, however it's 100% city streets both ways. I've had pretty much non-stop ERDTT for a week now due to the temp, which I actually don't mind. ERDTT runs the gas engine JUST enough to keep battery and cabin temps up. It's akin to a "high idle". Constant RPM, fairly steady load, pretty much a gas engine's sweet spot. Even with the crazy cold I'm still seeing ~43 mpg, something I'm quite sure not even a Prius would touch in this environment.

The other bonus of ERDTT? CABIN HEAT! It may just be me, being all of 5'10 and slender, but I get cold. The 6kW electric heater is great, down to about 25 degrees give or take. Lower than that, and you just need internal combustion given the design constraints. I've even found myself switching to "Hold" mode to get the engine revving for extra heat when ERDTT mode doesn't satisfy.
Welcome to the forum Alec!

I know what you mean about the electric heater......
 

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I've unfortunately had to drive my Volt more than anticipated this winter, due to the winter beater I bought to take over duty deciding to flat line a week before the coldest temps of the year.

My commute is only 8 miles, however it's 100% city streets both ways. I've had pretty much non-stop ERDTT for a week now due to the temp, which I actually don't mind. ERDTT runs the gas engine JUST enough to keep battery and cabin temps up. It's akin to a "high idle". Constant RPM, fairly steady load, pretty much a gas engine's sweet spot. Even with the crazy cold I'm still seeing ~43 mpg, something I'm quite sure not even a Prius would touch in this environment.

The other bonus of ERDTT? CABIN HEAT! It may just be me, being all of 5'10 and slender, but I get cold. The 6kW electric heater is great, down to about 25 degrees give or take. Lower than that, and you just need internal combustion given the design constraints. I've even found myself switching to "Hold" mode to get the engine revving for extra heat when ERDTT mode doesn't satisfy.
Just to clarify, ERDTT does not warm the battery. The Volt's battery has a dedicated ~2kW electric battery coolant heating unit. ERDTT provides warmed engine coolant to the cabin heater core (once the engine coolant reaches 160F), the Volt then maintains the engine coolant between 120F and 140F to continue to provide heat for the passengers.
 

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JimnTonic, congrats on your 10k milestone, that is quite a distance! Drive to Chicago area from Milwaukee daily? Not the best winter car? There is a lot to like about a Volt in the winter. Low profile means you are not pushed around by the heavy Midwest winter winds. I have seen many an SUV blown out of control on marginal surfaces. Keep good tires, preferably winter tires, and all will be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
JimnTonic, congrats on your 10k milestone, that is quite a distance! Drive to Chicago area from Milwaukee daily? Not the best winter car? There is a lot to like about a Volt in the winter. Low profile means you are not pushed around by the heavy Midwest winter winds. I have seen many an SUV blown out of control on marginal surfaces. Keep good tires, preferably winter tires, and all will be fine.
Thanks Cloud.. Yes, it's a daily commute. My Volt purchase was out of necessity more than anything. I was driving a 2001 LS430 and spending 400/month on gas. The car was approaching 210K miles and I was chasing a CEL with an emission test barreling down on me, so I started looking for a "suitable" replacement. The Volt, although not my first choice, ended up being the best choice. It's not a bad commuter car at all. I do run winter tires on it (General Altimax Arctics) and those make a world of difference. I spend 1/3 of what I was spending on fuel, even with the extreme cold and lower MPG, and I drive a newer car with some interesting tech...
 
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